The Development of an Admission Tool for the Assessment of the Palliative Care Symptom: Pain

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165551
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Development of an Admission Tool for the Assessment of the Palliative Care Symptom: Pain
Author(s):
Jackson, Hazel
Author Details:
Hazel Jackson, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USA
Abstract:
Pain is viewed as a palliative care symptom to be assessed and treated in all patients identified as having an end-of-life diagnosis and receiving care at VA Medical Centers. Oncology nurses provide care for 62% of the patients identified as having an end-of-life diagnosis. Chart audits by the external peer review abstractors revealed that pain was not assessed as a palliative care symptom in patients identified as at the end of life. As a result, the Atlanta VA Medical Centers' End-of-Life Performance (EPRP) scores did not meet the mandated performance of 95% in 1997 and 1998. The admission pain assessment tool was developed to meet the goal of assessing and treating pain as a palliative care symptom for patients near the end of life. After reviewing the medical center's nursing admission assessment form, a pain assessment tool was developed and incorporated into the admission form. The pain assessment tool was designed using sections of several published pain assessment scales. The revised nursing admission assessment form was approved by the medical center's forms committee and implemented in March 1999. The clinical nurse specialist group in-serviced the staff nurses on the medical floors on the use of the tool. Nurses were empowered to assess for pain on admission, transfer, and discharge. As a result, documentation of the assessment of pain as a palliative care issue for patients diagnosed as near the end of life increased to 100%. An informal evaluation of charts randomly selected on three inpatient medical floors demonstrated that 100% of new admissions were assessed for pain using the pain assessment tool. The poster will present the rationale for the development of the admission pain assessment tool, the technique used to develop the tool, and EPRP scores before and after the implementation of the tool. It also reports on two additional goals achieved by the development and implementation of the admission pain assessment tool: 1) Assessing pain as the fifth vital sign, and 2) JCAHO requirement to assess for pain on admission.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Development of an Admission Tool for the Assessment of the Palliative Care Symptom: Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Hazelen_US
dc.author.detailsHazel Jackson, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165551-
dc.description.abstractPain is viewed as a palliative care symptom to be assessed and treated in all patients identified as having an end-of-life diagnosis and receiving care at VA Medical Centers. Oncology nurses provide care for 62% of the patients identified as having an end-of-life diagnosis. Chart audits by the external peer review abstractors revealed that pain was not assessed as a palliative care symptom in patients identified as at the end of life. As a result, the Atlanta VA Medical Centers' End-of-Life Performance (EPRP) scores did not meet the mandated performance of 95% in 1997 and 1998. The admission pain assessment tool was developed to meet the goal of assessing and treating pain as a palliative care symptom for patients near the end of life. After reviewing the medical center's nursing admission assessment form, a pain assessment tool was developed and incorporated into the admission form. The pain assessment tool was designed using sections of several published pain assessment scales. The revised nursing admission assessment form was approved by the medical center's forms committee and implemented in March 1999. The clinical nurse specialist group in-serviced the staff nurses on the medical floors on the use of the tool. Nurses were empowered to assess for pain on admission, transfer, and discharge. As a result, documentation of the assessment of pain as a palliative care issue for patients diagnosed as near the end of life increased to 100%. An informal evaluation of charts randomly selected on three inpatient medical floors demonstrated that 100% of new admissions were assessed for pain using the pain assessment tool. The poster will present the rationale for the development of the admission pain assessment tool, the technique used to develop the tool, and EPRP scores before and after the implementation of the tool. It also reports on two additional goals achieved by the development and implementation of the admission pain assessment tool: 1) Assessing pain as the fifth vital sign, and 2) JCAHO requirement to assess for pain on admission.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:43Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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