2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165553
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Roles and Challenges in the Ambulatory Treatment Center
Author(s):
Scholz, Jacque
Author Details:
Jacque Scholz, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
An increasing number of oncology patients are being treated in ambulatory treatment centers. This year we have seen 64,000 patient visits and are projected to increase that number to 72,000 next year, with similar percentage increases in years to follow. The purposes of this project were (a) to identify the major challenges, and (b) to effect change to improve patient care and nurse satisfaction. We used a systematic approach to organize these challenges into three separate areas: (1) long treatments and too many patients for the space available; (2) lost or unreadable orders; and, (3) stressed and insufficient staff. New treatment areas with longer hours of operation and areas for pre-starts were opened. Housekeeping was involved in quick turnaround cleaning of isolation rooms. The one-touch system for faxing and storage of orders was developed and instituted in conjunction with pharmacy, with no change in methods of orders being faxed from the clinics. Nurses were recruited and agencies utilized following orientation of their nurses. More nurses were screened, motivated, and educated to assume leadership positions and prevent burnout of the few who were in those positions. Our results indicated that planned change is a dynamic process that shapes and is shaped by the personnel and the challenges involved. The contributions of all personnel involved may be simple or complex and affect individuals, groups, or institutions. Our process and findings revealed that institution of these changes enhanced oncology nursing practice and patient satisfaction, improved patient care, and decreased patient waiting times. Despite development for a large-scale oncology ambulatory treatment center, these findings are fully transferable for utilization by a smaller center.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Roles and Challenges in the Ambulatory Treatment Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorScholz, Jacqueen_US
dc.author.detailsJacque Scholz, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165553-
dc.description.abstractAn increasing number of oncology patients are being treated in ambulatory treatment centers. This year we have seen 64,000 patient visits and are projected to increase that number to 72,000 next year, with similar percentage increases in years to follow. The purposes of this project were (a) to identify the major challenges, and (b) to effect change to improve patient care and nurse satisfaction. We used a systematic approach to organize these challenges into three separate areas: (1) long treatments and too many patients for the space available; (2) lost or unreadable orders; and, (3) stressed and insufficient staff. New treatment areas with longer hours of operation and areas for pre-starts were opened. Housekeeping was involved in quick turnaround cleaning of isolation rooms. The one-touch system for faxing and storage of orders was developed and instituted in conjunction with pharmacy, with no change in methods of orders being faxed from the clinics. Nurses were recruited and agencies utilized following orientation of their nurses. More nurses were screened, motivated, and educated to assume leadership positions and prevent burnout of the few who were in those positions. Our results indicated that planned change is a dynamic process that shapes and is shaped by the personnel and the challenges involved. The contributions of all personnel involved may be simple or complex and affect individuals, groups, or institutions. Our process and findings revealed that institution of these changes enhanced oncology nursing practice and patient satisfaction, improved patient care, and decreased patient waiting times. Despite development for a large-scale oncology ambulatory treatment center, these findings are fully transferable for utilization by a smaller center.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:45Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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