First Stage of a Longitudinal Study of the Impact of an Electronic Medical Record System on Clinical Practice and Patient Outcomes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165556
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
First Stage of a Longitudinal Study of the Impact of an Electronic Medical Record System on Clinical Practice and Patient Outcomes
Author(s):
McLane, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon McLane, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Electronic medical record (EMR) systems have been in use for over two decades. Many studies documenting nursing satisfaction with EMRs, the benefits of an EMR, implementation barriers, user acceptance, the importance of staff buy-in, and the importance of attitude and expectations to user buy-in were found in the literature. Central to most studies is the significance of nursing staff buy-in to an EMR, and the dependency of buy-in on staff attitudes and expectations. Buy-in is a precursor to effective use which is, once again, a prerequisite to collecting and making optimum use of the data contained in an EMR. Data collected from an EMR containing rich, accurate documentation of nursing practice interventions supports data-driven practice changes and documentation of the import of the care provided by nurses. A Likert-scale survey tool was administered to all nursing staff on an inpatient oncology unit. Cronbach's-Alpha was used to establish reliability. Content validity was evaluated using a panel of experts. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. Forty nurses (48%) completed the survey. Fifty-six percent had worked with an EMR elsewhere, and 81% had a PC in their home. Seventy-eight percent agreed or strongly agreed that computers free nurses of boring, repetitive tasks. Fifty-six percent agreed or strongly agreed that providers are more closely monitored if computers are used. Fifty-two percent disagreed or strongly disagreed that computers compromise patient confidentiality. The first step in evaluating the effectiveness and outcomes of our EMR implementation was the determination of nurses' attitudes regarding an EMR. Assessment of these perspectives provides rich information to guide communications regarding the project. Understanding how the nursing staff feels about computers in the workplace and the role computers can play in practice will enable the implementation team to structure communications, to reframe misconceptions, and to offer possible new perceptions. Secondly, understanding expectations can enable the implementation team to offer expectations through communication and other interactions. Studies have shown that unmet expectations can derail the potential that an EMR can provide. Another benefit of measuring expectations may be revision of the implementation plan to meet a broadly expressed need.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFirst Stage of a Longitudinal Study of the Impact of an Electronic Medical Record System on Clinical Practice and Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcLane, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon McLane, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165556-
dc.description.abstractElectronic medical record (EMR) systems have been in use for over two decades. Many studies documenting nursing satisfaction with EMRs, the benefits of an EMR, implementation barriers, user acceptance, the importance of staff buy-in, and the importance of attitude and expectations to user buy-in were found in the literature. Central to most studies is the significance of nursing staff buy-in to an EMR, and the dependency of buy-in on staff attitudes and expectations. Buy-in is a precursor to effective use which is, once again, a prerequisite to collecting and making optimum use of the data contained in an EMR. Data collected from an EMR containing rich, accurate documentation of nursing practice interventions supports data-driven practice changes and documentation of the import of the care provided by nurses. A Likert-scale survey tool was administered to all nursing staff on an inpatient oncology unit. Cronbach's-Alpha was used to establish reliability. Content validity was evaluated using a panel of experts. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used to analyze the data. Forty nurses (48%) completed the survey. Fifty-six percent had worked with an EMR elsewhere, and 81% had a PC in their home. Seventy-eight percent agreed or strongly agreed that computers free nurses of boring, repetitive tasks. Fifty-six percent agreed or strongly agreed that providers are more closely monitored if computers are used. Fifty-two percent disagreed or strongly disagreed that computers compromise patient confidentiality. The first step in evaluating the effectiveness and outcomes of our EMR implementation was the determination of nurses' attitudes regarding an EMR. Assessment of these perspectives provides rich information to guide communications regarding the project. Understanding how the nursing staff feels about computers in the workplace and the role computers can play in practice will enable the implementation team to structure communications, to reframe misconceptions, and to offer possible new perceptions. Secondly, understanding expectations can enable the implementation team to offer expectations through communication and other interactions. Studies have shown that unmet expectations can derail the potential that an EMR can provide. Another benefit of measuring expectations may be revision of the implementation plan to meet a broadly expressed need.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:48Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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