2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165557
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Management Behaviors Associated With Nurse Retention
Author(s):
Owens, Marian
Author Details:
Marian Owens, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
The aging nursing workforce and decreasing numbers of students choosing nursing careers raise concerns about the future availability of nurses. Women's continued declining interest in nursing and their wide choice of career opportunities are reasons for employers to fear an impending shortage of nurses and reasons to retain nurses currently in the workforce. To survive in the healthcare environment, providers must be aware that employees are their most important asset. Good manager-nurse relationships have proven important to retaining employees. Because management behaviors are key to staff retention, we conducted a study to determine what specific behaviors are associated with nurses retention. Kanter's model, Structural Determinants of Behavior in Organizations, provided the conceptual framework for the study. In her model, those with access to power (support, information, resources) and opportunity (rewards, recognition, chances to develop skills) are more committed to their role and the organization. We surveyed 120 staff nurses to determine which nurse managers' behaviors keep staff members motivated and which behaviors cause staff to consider transferring or resigning. From content analysis of the survey, we labeled seven categories of behaviors, with defined behaviors under each category. An experienced qualitative researcher conducted an independent analysis to establish accuracy. Findings were further validated by comparison with behaviors reported in the literature. We developed a manager self-assessment survey from this which we shared with the nursing leadership. Nurse managers have a vital interest in learning what behaviors have positive and negative effects on nurse motivation and retention. New nurse managers and nurses interested in management positions also have an interest in learning to develop behaviors associated with retention. Managers must realize that their behaviors directly impact retention, perhaps more than general employee benefits do. Providers of continuing education for nurse managers can develop content addressing staff retention. Additionally, long-term studies could determine the benefits of continuing education courses on staff retention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManagement Behaviors Associated With Nurse Retentionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Marianen_US
dc.author.detailsMarian Owens, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165557-
dc.description.abstractThe aging nursing workforce and decreasing numbers of students choosing nursing careers raise concerns about the future availability of nurses. Women's continued declining interest in nursing and their wide choice of career opportunities are reasons for employers to fear an impending shortage of nurses and reasons to retain nurses currently in the workforce. To survive in the healthcare environment, providers must be aware that employees are their most important asset. Good manager-nurse relationships have proven important to retaining employees. Because management behaviors are key to staff retention, we conducted a study to determine what specific behaviors are associated with nurses retention. Kanter's model, Structural Determinants of Behavior in Organizations, provided the conceptual framework for the study. In her model, those with access to power (support, information, resources) and opportunity (rewards, recognition, chances to develop skills) are more committed to their role and the organization. We surveyed 120 staff nurses to determine which nurse managers' behaviors keep staff members motivated and which behaviors cause staff to consider transferring or resigning. From content analysis of the survey, we labeled seven categories of behaviors, with defined behaviors under each category. An experienced qualitative researcher conducted an independent analysis to establish accuracy. Findings were further validated by comparison with behaviors reported in the literature. We developed a manager self-assessment survey from this which we shared with the nursing leadership. Nurse managers have a vital interest in learning what behaviors have positive and negative effects on nurse motivation and retention. New nurse managers and nurses interested in management positions also have an interest in learning to develop behaviors associated with retention. Managers must realize that their behaviors directly impact retention, perhaps more than general employee benefits do. Providers of continuing education for nurse managers can develop content addressing staff retention. Additionally, long-term studies could determine the benefits of continuing education courses on staff retention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:49Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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