Breast Cancer Rehabilitation in the United States and Japan: A Comparison of Approaches

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165558
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breast Cancer Rehabilitation in the United States and Japan: A Comparison of Approaches
Author(s):
Kraatz, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Kraatz, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, email: kraatz@umn.edu
Abstract:
During the past few decades, the incidence of breast cancer has risen rapidly in both the United States and Japan. Although patients and nurses in both countries share common problems, there are differences in approaches to nursing care between the two culturally distinct countries. The purpose of this qualitative study was to compare and contrast the approaches to breast cancer rehabilitation between nurses in Japan and the United States. This qualitative study was guided by the constructivist paradigm. Matched samples of 18 oncology nurses (total N = 36) from metropolitan areas of both Japan and the United States were asked to respond to a case study involving a woman struggling with breast cancer. Data was collected through open-ended interviews. The responses were analyzed using a manifest content analysis strategy in order to determine themes reflective of the nurses' thought processes as well as their management strategies. Inter-rater reliability of transcript coding was assessed and revealed greater than 80% agreement between all coders for all themes. Four major themes were identified in both samples (Facing Reality, Involving Support, Reconstructing Body and Life, and Finding Meaning), with each theme having multiple subthemes. The results revealed multiple areas of similarities, but also marked areas of difference between the approaches used by nurses in the two countries. Certain subthemes were characteristic responses for the Japanese sample of nurses but not the nurses from the United States, and vice versa. The findings may stimulate dialogue and critical reflection on the strategies adopted by nurses in their own practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreast Cancer Rehabilitation in the United States and Japan: A Comparison of Approachesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKraatz, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Kraatz, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, email: kraatz@umn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165558-
dc.description.abstractDuring the past few decades, the incidence of breast cancer has risen rapidly in both the United States and Japan. Although patients and nurses in both countries share common problems, there are differences in approaches to nursing care between the two culturally distinct countries. The purpose of this qualitative study was to compare and contrast the approaches to breast cancer rehabilitation between nurses in Japan and the United States. This qualitative study was guided by the constructivist paradigm. Matched samples of 18 oncology nurses (total N = 36) from metropolitan areas of both Japan and the United States were asked to respond to a case study involving a woman struggling with breast cancer. Data was collected through open-ended interviews. The responses were analyzed using a manifest content analysis strategy in order to determine themes reflective of the nurses' thought processes as well as their management strategies. Inter-rater reliability of transcript coding was assessed and revealed greater than 80% agreement between all coders for all themes. Four major themes were identified in both samples (Facing Reality, Involving Support, Reconstructing Body and Life, and Finding Meaning), with each theme having multiple subthemes. The results revealed multiple areas of similarities, but also marked areas of difference between the approaches used by nurses in the two countries. Certain subthemes were characteristic responses for the Japanese sample of nurses but not the nurses from the United States, and vice versa. The findings may stimulate dialogue and critical reflection on the strategies adopted by nurses in their own practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:50Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.