Relationship of Complementary Therapy and Self-Help and Functional Health Status Among Mexican-American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165559
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship of Complementary Therapy and Self-Help and Functional Health Status Among Mexican-American Women
Author(s):
Owens, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Owens, Lackland Air Force Base, Clinical Research Squadron, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, USA
Abstract:
This purpose of this secondary analysis study is to describe Mexican American (MA) women's use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) during breast cancer treatment. This study describes the resources accessed and the relationship of CAM variables with self-care/self-help, functional status, and disease characteristics. Background: Culture influences priority setting, level of trust in healthcare providers, and perceptions of the relationship between behavior and health outcomes. In order to fully understand this important aspect of interpersonal dynamics, the influence of culture on decisions for self-care needs to be developed more fully, particularly within sociocultural healthcare contexts. Braden's Self-Help Model provided the framework for the original clinical trial study testing the effectiveness of an oncology support intervention for women receiving breast cancer treatment. The clinical trial study included Anglo, African American, and Mexican American women. The data from the Mexican American women were used for this secondary analysis. Methods: Data were collected after medical treatment as underway and treatment-related side effects were evidenced. The mean age of the 195 subjects was 50.8 years (SD = 11.9). The majority of the women (84%) were experiencing their first breast cancer diagnosis. Measures of the selected variables met reliability and validity criteria. A correlation matrix was generated for the following variables: functional health status, over all side effect experience, cancer folk beliefs, belief in cancer treatment alternatives, resources used, self-help, and self-care. A significance level of 0.05 was set for the discovery-context analysis. Results: Resources used were moderately correlated with self-care (r = +.39) and weakly correlated with the belief in CAM use (r = +.15). A strong relationship demonstrated that those having greater folk belief strength also demonstrated belief in self-care alternatives (r = +.87). Findings also indicated that belief in CAM was associated with perception of functional health status (r = .52); however CAM beliefs were not significantly correlated with overall side effects experience.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship of Complementary Therapy and Self-Help and Functional Health Status Among Mexican-American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOwens, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Owens, Lackland Air Force Base, Clinical Research Squadron, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165559-
dc.description.abstractThis purpose of this secondary analysis study is to describe Mexican American (MA) women's use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) during breast cancer treatment. This study describes the resources accessed and the relationship of CAM variables with self-care/self-help, functional status, and disease characteristics. Background: Culture influences priority setting, level of trust in healthcare providers, and perceptions of the relationship between behavior and health outcomes. In order to fully understand this important aspect of interpersonal dynamics, the influence of culture on decisions for self-care needs to be developed more fully, particularly within sociocultural healthcare contexts. Braden's Self-Help Model provided the framework for the original clinical trial study testing the effectiveness of an oncology support intervention for women receiving breast cancer treatment. The clinical trial study included Anglo, African American, and Mexican American women. The data from the Mexican American women were used for this secondary analysis. Methods: Data were collected after medical treatment as underway and treatment-related side effects were evidenced. The mean age of the 195 subjects was 50.8 years (SD = 11.9). The majority of the women (84%) were experiencing their first breast cancer diagnosis. Measures of the selected variables met reliability and validity criteria. A correlation matrix was generated for the following variables: functional health status, over all side effect experience, cancer folk beliefs, belief in cancer treatment alternatives, resources used, self-help, and self-care. A significance level of 0.05 was set for the discovery-context analysis. Results: Resources used were moderately correlated with self-care (r = +.39) and weakly correlated with the belief in CAM use (r = +.15). A strong relationship demonstrated that those having greater folk belief strength also demonstrated belief in self-care alternatives (r = +.87). Findings also indicated that belief in CAM was associated with perception of functional health status (r = .52); however CAM beliefs were not significantly correlated with overall side effects experience.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:51Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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