Improving the Comfort and Satisfactions of Arabic-Speaking Patients With Effective Nurse-Patient Communication

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165561
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving the Comfort and Satisfactions of Arabic-Speaking Patients With Effective Nurse-Patient Communication
Author(s):
Aubrecht, Vlasta
Author Details:
Vlasta Aubrecht, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Persons hospitalized for cancer treatment are often anxious, and that anxiety can be heightened when they are being treated in the United States and do not speak English. Respect for individuals and care for the whole person are central values in oncology nursing. However, nurses sometimes lack knowledge about the language and cultures of those for whom they provide care. Our surgical urology and orthopedic unit admits a high percentage of Arabic-speaking patients. The language assistance department provides interpreters, translation of medical documents, and access to a 24-hour-a-day language line. These resources provide support for accurate communications between staff and patients. However, our nursing staff members identified an opportunity to improve the service and increase patient comfort and satisfaction by helping patients communicate their needs in their own language and helping all staff respond directly to the patients. We initiated a project to identify the most commonly translated information nurses give to patients about procedures routinely performed within our specialty. A nurse fluent in Arabic assessed patient satisfaction regarding communication with the nursing staff about basic needs. We developed a notebook of pictures and words in Arabic that can be used by patients and nurses to communicate basic needs and instructions for procedures. The ability of the staff to more directly respond to patient needs improved patient comfort and increased satisfaction with the nurse-patient relationship. Patient and staff evaluation data were used to revise our nursing care. Comforting is not only pillow fluffing or covering patients with warm blankets, it is also being attuned to patient cues of distress and providing nursing measures to alleviate discomfort. Comforting begins when nurses detect patient distress and is followed by assessment, intervention, and evaluation of outcomes. Patients express discomfort verbally and nonverbally through body language or physiologic changes. Comfort strategies include listening and offering explanations. The ability to communicate and respond quickly to identified needs is important in making patients comfortable. When nurses respond to patient discomfort, patients perceive the nurses as competent and caring.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving the Comfort and Satisfactions of Arabic-Speaking Patients With Effective Nurse-Patient Communicationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAubrecht, Vlastaen_US
dc.author.detailsVlasta Aubrecht, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165561-
dc.description.abstractPersons hospitalized for cancer treatment are often anxious, and that anxiety can be heightened when they are being treated in the United States and do not speak English. Respect for individuals and care for the whole person are central values in oncology nursing. However, nurses sometimes lack knowledge about the language and cultures of those for whom they provide care. Our surgical urology and orthopedic unit admits a high percentage of Arabic-speaking patients. The language assistance department provides interpreters, translation of medical documents, and access to a 24-hour-a-day language line. These resources provide support for accurate communications between staff and patients. However, our nursing staff members identified an opportunity to improve the service and increase patient comfort and satisfaction by helping patients communicate their needs in their own language and helping all staff respond directly to the patients. We initiated a project to identify the most commonly translated information nurses give to patients about procedures routinely performed within our specialty. A nurse fluent in Arabic assessed patient satisfaction regarding communication with the nursing staff about basic needs. We developed a notebook of pictures and words in Arabic that can be used by patients and nurses to communicate basic needs and instructions for procedures. The ability of the staff to more directly respond to patient needs improved patient comfort and increased satisfaction with the nurse-patient relationship. Patient and staff evaluation data were used to revise our nursing care. Comforting is not only pillow fluffing or covering patients with warm blankets, it is also being attuned to patient cues of distress and providing nursing measures to alleviate discomfort. Comforting begins when nurses detect patient distress and is followed by assessment, intervention, and evaluation of outcomes. Patients express discomfort verbally and nonverbally through body language or physiologic changes. Comfort strategies include listening and offering explanations. The ability to communicate and respond quickly to identified needs is important in making patients comfortable. When nurses respond to patient discomfort, patients perceive the nurses as competent and caring.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:54Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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