Training Nurses for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Programs in Developing Countries

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165563
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Training Nurses for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Programs in Developing Countries
Author(s):
Donahue, Nora
Author Details:
Nora Donahue, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-International Outreach, Memphis, Tennessee, USA
Abstract:
Background: Well-trained nurses are essential to the modern pediatric hematology-oncology (H-O) team and crucial to optimal care of children with cancer. In many developing countries, pediatric oncology programs are staffed by nurses who lack formal H-O education. To address this problem, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (SJ), with the Society of Professional Nurses, The Hospital Benjamin Bloom (HBB), and the Ministry of Health of El Salvador began a program of basic H-O education for nurses in Latin America. Design/Methods: A three-month theory and clinical practice course is open to qualified nurses in Latin America. Scholarships cover transportation, lodging, and food. Clinical rotations are done on the pediatric oncology ward of the BBH. The first course taught the teachers. During week one, students received clinical training while five Salvadoran nurse educators attended specific lectures by SJ nurses. During week two, the nurse educators taught the students while SJ nurses observed. Subsequent weeks utilized the same format. Lectures were translated into Spanish and were supplemented with electronic slide presentations. During the second course, SJ nurses observed the Salvadoran educators and helped to refine their lectures. An evaluation process was designed to allow rapid feedback and modification of the program. Results: The two courses to date trained 36 nurses from Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Chile, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Mexico, and El Salvador. Student progress was evaluated weekly through testing and evaluation of clinical skills. We are now evaluating knowledge disseminated to the students' home hospitals and changes that have ensued. Conclusions: 1. Comments from physician directors of oncology programs have been positive. 2. The nurses develop an informal support system and sprit de corps that should encourage the establishment of formal nursing societies in their countries and further improve nursing care. 3. This program is an example of successful international outreach in pediatric H-O. Knowledge transmitted to local educators is being conveyed to a widening group of pediatric oncology nurses, and evaluation and follow-up continue.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTraining Nurses for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Programs in Developing Countriesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDonahue, Noraen_US
dc.author.detailsNora Donahue, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-International Outreach, Memphis, Tennessee, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165563-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Well-trained nurses are essential to the modern pediatric hematology-oncology (H-O) team and crucial to optimal care of children with cancer. In many developing countries, pediatric oncology programs are staffed by nurses who lack formal H-O education. To address this problem, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (SJ), with the Society of Professional Nurses, The Hospital Benjamin Bloom (HBB), and the Ministry of Health of El Salvador began a program of basic H-O education for nurses in Latin America. Design/Methods: A three-month theory and clinical practice course is open to qualified nurses in Latin America. Scholarships cover transportation, lodging, and food. Clinical rotations are done on the pediatric oncology ward of the BBH. The first course taught the teachers. During week one, students received clinical training while five Salvadoran nurse educators attended specific lectures by SJ nurses. During week two, the nurse educators taught the students while SJ nurses observed. Subsequent weeks utilized the same format. Lectures were translated into Spanish and were supplemented with electronic slide presentations. During the second course, SJ nurses observed the Salvadoran educators and helped to refine their lectures. An evaluation process was designed to allow rapid feedback and modification of the program. Results: The two courses to date trained 36 nurses from Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Chile, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Mexico, and El Salvador. Student progress was evaluated weekly through testing and evaluation of clinical skills. We are now evaluating knowledge disseminated to the students' home hospitals and changes that have ensued. Conclusions: 1. Comments from physician directors of oncology programs have been positive. 2. The nurses develop an informal support system and sprit de corps that should encourage the establishment of formal nursing societies in their countries and further improve nursing care. 3. This program is an example of successful international outreach in pediatric H-O. Knowledge transmitted to local educators is being conveyed to a widening group of pediatric oncology nurses, and evaluation and follow-up continue.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:56Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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