2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165565
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Barriers of Recruiting Ethnic Minority Cancer Patients in Pain Research
Author(s):
Huang, Hsiu-Ying
Author Details:
Hsiu-Ying Huang, Assistant Professor, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: hyhuang@u.washington.edu
Abstract:
Study findings will be invalid to ethnic minority patients if study participants are not representative to them. Recruiting ethnic minority patients is particularly vital in cancer pain research because they often are at risk of under-treatment. Yet, difficulty in recruiting ethnic minorities in research is common. It is important to identify in which stage of recruitment the barrier emerged so that effective strategies can be planned. The purpose of this study was to identify if barriers of involving ethnic minorities exist in referral, eligibility criteria, or consenting. Downstream analysis of data from targeting population to study participants serves as the framework for this exploratory study. About 13% of the cancer patients were ethnic minorities in the institution where we collected data. In a 21-month period, we obtained 695 patient referrals from clinicians for two NIH-funded cancer pain studies. Brief patient demographic data from the referral were entered into a computerized scheduling system that also included eligibility and enrollment status data. Data were excluded if ethnicity was unknown or eligibility was pending. The final sample includes 456 patients; 83% were Caucasians, 6% African-American, 7% Asian, 2% Hispanic, and 3% other. Two hundred sixty four (55%) were eligible and 192 (73% enrollment rate) consented to participate. When combined as a group, there were 13% ethnic minorities in targeting population (estimated), 17% in referred population, 13% in eligible patients, and 13% in enrolled patients. Chi-square tests were used to determine if there were proportional differences between Caucasians and ethnic minorities in eligibility and consenting. Results indicated that a higher proportion of ethnic minority patients (58%) were ineligible than Caucasians (39%), but no significant differences were found in consenting (71% versus 74%). The reasons for ineligible ethnic minorities included no pain and symptoms (20%) and non-English speaking (24%). Our findings suggest no bias in clinician referral of ethnic minority patients. Minorities are equally willing to participate in studies as Caucasians. We conclude that barriers are likely to occur in defining and assessing eligibility. Specific strategies to target the barriers (i.e., language issues, denial of symptoms as socially acceptable way to refuse participation) will improve minority participation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBarriers of Recruiting Ethnic Minority Cancer Patients in Pain Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Hsiu-Yingen_US
dc.author.detailsHsiu-Ying Huang, Assistant Professor, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: hyhuang@u.washington.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165565-
dc.description.abstractStudy findings will be invalid to ethnic minority patients if study participants are not representative to them. Recruiting ethnic minority patients is particularly vital in cancer pain research because they often are at risk of under-treatment. Yet, difficulty in recruiting ethnic minorities in research is common. It is important to identify in which stage of recruitment the barrier emerged so that effective strategies can be planned. The purpose of this study was to identify if barriers of involving ethnic minorities exist in referral, eligibility criteria, or consenting. Downstream analysis of data from targeting population to study participants serves as the framework for this exploratory study. About 13% of the cancer patients were ethnic minorities in the institution where we collected data. In a 21-month period, we obtained 695 patient referrals from clinicians for two NIH-funded cancer pain studies. Brief patient demographic data from the referral were entered into a computerized scheduling system that also included eligibility and enrollment status data. Data were excluded if ethnicity was unknown or eligibility was pending. The final sample includes 456 patients; 83% were Caucasians, 6% African-American, 7% Asian, 2% Hispanic, and 3% other. Two hundred sixty four (55%) were eligible and 192 (73% enrollment rate) consented to participate. When combined as a group, there were 13% ethnic minorities in targeting population (estimated), 17% in referred population, 13% in eligible patients, and 13% in enrolled patients. Chi-square tests were used to determine if there were proportional differences between Caucasians and ethnic minorities in eligibility and consenting. Results indicated that a higher proportion of ethnic minority patients (58%) were ineligible than Caucasians (39%), but no significant differences were found in consenting (71% versus 74%). The reasons for ineligible ethnic minorities included no pain and symptoms (20%) and non-English speaking (24%). Our findings suggest no bias in clinician referral of ethnic minority patients. Minorities are equally willing to participate in studies as Caucasians. We conclude that barriers are likely to occur in defining and assessing eligibility. Specific strategies to target the barriers (i.e., language issues, denial of symptoms as socially acceptable way to refuse participation) will improve minority participation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:58Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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