Religious Influences on Acculturation and Health Behavior Among a Group of United States Middle Eastern Women: Pilot Data

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165566
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Religious Influences on Acculturation and Health Behavior Among a Group of United States Middle Eastern Women: Pilot Data
Author(s):
Kawar, Lina
Author Details:
Lina Kawar, University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA
Abstract:
Studies of acculturation and health behaviors among United States (US) resident Middle-Eastern women often assume that all such women are Muslims. There is, however, diversity of religious affiliation within this group with a substantial minority of Christians, as well. The impact of religious affiliation on acculturation for these women, as well as the possible mediating or modifying effects on the relationship between acculturation and health behaviors has not been examined. This cross-sectional predictive study examines how religious-affiliation Muslim/Christian) impacts the relationships among cultural beliefs, acculturation, and health behaviors among U.S. resident Middle-Eastern women. The theoretical framework proposes that demographics, knowledge, enabling, and sociocultural factors (acculturation, social norms, and influences) affect the psychological variables (affect, attitudes, and habits), which in turn affect participation in health behaviors. This pilot study involved a snowball sample of 31 healthy US resident Middle-Eastern women who completed questionnaires measuring model variables. Mean age was 47 years (range 24-71), mean length of stay in the US was 15.5 years (range 2-34). Eleven were Muslims and 20 were Christians. The acculturation scale was adapted from Faragallah et al. (1997) (Cronbach's alpha 0.77) and the social norms scale was modified from Thompson (2000) (Cronbach's alpha 0.38). Measures of other concepts were created for this study. Analysis will include reliability report of the developed measures. The proposed data analyses include religious affiliation group comparisons (t-tests and Chi-square) on demographics, measures of cultural belief, acculturation, and health behaviors. In addition, multiple regression will be used to test for possible mediating or moderating effects of religious affiliation on the relationships among cultural beliefs, acculturation, and health behaviors. Analysis is in progress and results will be available for this presentation. Middle-Eastern women, as a group, have high breast cancer mortality, which could potentially be modified by increased participation in screening. This study's findings will contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the influence of religious affiliation on Middle-Eastern women's acculturation when residing in the U.S. and on these women's participation in health behaviors. The knowledge will also ultimately aid in developing culturally sensitive interventions to increase these women's awareness and participation in breast cancer screening programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReligious Influences on Acculturation and Health Behavior Among a Group of United States Middle Eastern Women: Pilot Dataen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKawar, Linaen_US
dc.author.detailsLina Kawar, University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165566-
dc.description.abstractStudies of acculturation and health behaviors among United States (US) resident Middle-Eastern women often assume that all such women are Muslims. There is, however, diversity of religious affiliation within this group with a substantial minority of Christians, as well. The impact of religious affiliation on acculturation for these women, as well as the possible mediating or modifying effects on the relationship between acculturation and health behaviors has not been examined. This cross-sectional predictive study examines how religious-affiliation Muslim/Christian) impacts the relationships among cultural beliefs, acculturation, and health behaviors among U.S. resident Middle-Eastern women. The theoretical framework proposes that demographics, knowledge, enabling, and sociocultural factors (acculturation, social norms, and influences) affect the psychological variables (affect, attitudes, and habits), which in turn affect participation in health behaviors. This pilot study involved a snowball sample of 31 healthy US resident Middle-Eastern women who completed questionnaires measuring model variables. Mean age was 47 years (range 24-71), mean length of stay in the US was 15.5 years (range 2-34). Eleven were Muslims and 20 were Christians. The acculturation scale was adapted from Faragallah et al. (1997) (Cronbach's alpha 0.77) and the social norms scale was modified from Thompson (2000) (Cronbach's alpha 0.38). Measures of other concepts were created for this study. Analysis will include reliability report of the developed measures. The proposed data analyses include religious affiliation group comparisons (t-tests and Chi-square) on demographics, measures of cultural belief, acculturation, and health behaviors. In addition, multiple regression will be used to test for possible mediating or moderating effects of religious affiliation on the relationships among cultural beliefs, acculturation, and health behaviors. Analysis is in progress and results will be available for this presentation. Middle-Eastern women, as a group, have high breast cancer mortality, which could potentially be modified by increased participation in screening. This study's findings will contribute to the body of knowledge regarding the influence of religious affiliation on Middle-Eastern women's acculturation when residing in the U.S. and on these women's participation in health behaviors. The knowledge will also ultimately aid in developing culturally sensitive interventions to increase these women's awareness and participation in breast cancer screening programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:20:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:20:59Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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