Identifying Nursing Interventions That Target Clinical Outcomes Surrounding Discharge of Adult Hematology Transplant Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165568
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Nursing Interventions That Target Clinical Outcomes Surrounding Discharge of Adult Hematology Transplant Patients
Author(s):
Cooke, Liz
Author Details:
Liz Cooke, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA
Abstract:
Background: Blood or stem cell reinfusion/transplant continues to have a substantial risk to mortality and morbidity. Although many transplants are now being conducted in the outpatient setting, it is not uncommon for this population of patients to be readmitted within the first six months to manage a variety of clinical and psychological issues. Problem/Purpose: To identify ways nursing can improve patient outcomes in the discharge process and follow-up, a retrospective chart review was conducted on 100 adult hematology transplant patients for the year 2000 to assess discharge and readmission patterns. Methods: Demographic data consisted of marital status, age, insurance, and diagnosis. Clinical variables included time from diagnosis, conditioning regimen, remission status at the time of transplant, type of transplant, presence of comorbid conditions, history of previous transplant, number of infections, number of bacteremic episodes, remission status after transplant, and psychosocial support. Information on discharge and readmission patterns was collected. Data for each admission was collected including reason for admission, clinical condition, discharge or death date, number of days of each admission, and length of time between each discharge and readmission. Results: Some of the initial findings of the first 50 patients are gender (62% male, 38% female), and type of transplant (42% allogeneic, 42% autologous, 16% other). Of the patients discharged following transplant, 25 were readmitted with 17 being readmitted once, 7 being readmitted twice, and one patient being readmitted four times. Reasons for the admission include 40% infection-related, 16% fluid/nutrition, 24% transplant specific, and 20% miscellaneous. Average number of days for readmission was 10 (range 1-46), with average time to readmission post transplant being 18 days (range 0-116). Conclusions: These data 1) help identify populations with potential discharge problems and higher readmission risk, 2) identify specific variables surrounding discharge and readmission, and 3) identify post transplant outcomes amenable to nursing interventions, especially patterns related to infection, fluids, and nutrition. This information provides a basis for planning nursing strategies to improve the discharge process, prevention or early detection of complications, decrease readmission rates, and assist the patient with information to physically and psychologically cope with issues surrounding the transplant.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying Nursing Interventions That Target Clinical Outcomes Surrounding Discharge of Adult Hematology Transplant Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooke, Lizen_US
dc.author.detailsLiz Cooke, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165568-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Blood or stem cell reinfusion/transplant continues to have a substantial risk to mortality and morbidity. Although many transplants are now being conducted in the outpatient setting, it is not uncommon for this population of patients to be readmitted within the first six months to manage a variety of clinical and psychological issues. Problem/Purpose: To identify ways nursing can improve patient outcomes in the discharge process and follow-up, a retrospective chart review was conducted on 100 adult hematology transplant patients for the year 2000 to assess discharge and readmission patterns. Methods: Demographic data consisted of marital status, age, insurance, and diagnosis. Clinical variables included time from diagnosis, conditioning regimen, remission status at the time of transplant, type of transplant, presence of comorbid conditions, history of previous transplant, number of infections, number of bacteremic episodes, remission status after transplant, and psychosocial support. Information on discharge and readmission patterns was collected. Data for each admission was collected including reason for admission, clinical condition, discharge or death date, number of days of each admission, and length of time between each discharge and readmission. Results: Some of the initial findings of the first 50 patients are gender (62% male, 38% female), and type of transplant (42% allogeneic, 42% autologous, 16% other). Of the patients discharged following transplant, 25 were readmitted with 17 being readmitted once, 7 being readmitted twice, and one patient being readmitted four times. Reasons for the admission include 40% infection-related, 16% fluid/nutrition, 24% transplant specific, and 20% miscellaneous. Average number of days for readmission was 10 (range 1-46), with average time to readmission post transplant being 18 days (range 0-116). Conclusions: These data 1) help identify populations with potential discharge problems and higher readmission risk, 2) identify specific variables surrounding discharge and readmission, and 3) identify post transplant outcomes amenable to nursing interventions, especially patterns related to infection, fluids, and nutrition. This information provides a basis for planning nursing strategies to improve the discharge process, prevention or early detection of complications, decrease readmission rates, and assist the patient with information to physically and psychologically cope with issues surrounding the transplant.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:01Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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