A Multidisciplinary Approach to Discharging Head and Neck Cancer Patients Following Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165570
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Multidisciplinary Approach to Discharging Head and Neck Cancer Patients Following Surgery
Author(s):
Schiech, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Schiech, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: L_Schiech@fccc.edu
Abstract:
Head and neck cancers comprise about 5% of all cancers diagnosed; but for those oncology nurses who work with this population, the complexity and decreased resources such as inadequate insurance, few financial reserves, and variable family support, pose major challenges. Surgical resection of the head and neck area with curative intent results in physical, psychosocial, and functional impairments that complicate postoperative care. Physically, patients may have tracheostomies for airway protection, feeding tubes, drains, and incisions that require care and a great deal of education and support for the patients and families. Psychosocially, patients may have body image concerns if the incisions are visible, along with postoperative edema, as well as past or present substance abuse (alcohol and tobacco) problems to overcome. Functionally, patients may have difficulty with speech and swallowing as well as neck, arm, and shoulder mobility concerns. At a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, a multidisciplinary team approach has been used consisting of staff nurses (SN), a case manager (CM), a social worker (SW), speech and physical therapists, physicians, and a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) to assist in dealing with these concerns. The team meets once a week to discuss needs and disposition of the patient. The physician coordinates and plans the patient's surgical course including discharge, rehabilitation, and ongoing patient monitoring. The CNS initiates education of patients and families for care needed at home, collaborates with homecare nurses regarding care of patients at home, provides emotional support, and monitors the patient for prevention of side effects from substance abuse as needed. The SN continues the educational process by reinforcing prior teaching, initiating new teaching, and promoting the basic care and rehabilitation of the patient. The SW offers continued emotional support and is very effective in dealing with substance abuse problems by recommending alcohol rehabilitation. The CM arranges for nursing, rehabilitation, and speech therapy support as well as supplies and equipment for the patient's discharge. Rehabilitation staff is consulted as needed. This multidisciplinary team approach has been successful at improving quality of life, reducing complications, meeting educational needs, reducing length of stay, and rehabilitating patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Multidisciplinary Approach to Discharging Head and Neck Cancer Patients Following Surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchiech, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Schiech, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: L_Schiech@fccc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165570-
dc.description.abstractHead and neck cancers comprise about 5% of all cancers diagnosed; but for those oncology nurses who work with this population, the complexity and decreased resources such as inadequate insurance, few financial reserves, and variable family support, pose major challenges. Surgical resection of the head and neck area with curative intent results in physical, psychosocial, and functional impairments that complicate postoperative care. Physically, patients may have tracheostomies for airway protection, feeding tubes, drains, and incisions that require care and a great deal of education and support for the patients and families. Psychosocially, patients may have body image concerns if the incisions are visible, along with postoperative edema, as well as past or present substance abuse (alcohol and tobacco) problems to overcome. Functionally, patients may have difficulty with speech and swallowing as well as neck, arm, and shoulder mobility concerns. At a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, a multidisciplinary team approach has been used consisting of staff nurses (SN), a case manager (CM), a social worker (SW), speech and physical therapists, physicians, and a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) to assist in dealing with these concerns. The team meets once a week to discuss needs and disposition of the patient. The physician coordinates and plans the patient's surgical course including discharge, rehabilitation, and ongoing patient monitoring. The CNS initiates education of patients and families for care needed at home, collaborates with homecare nurses regarding care of patients at home, provides emotional support, and monitors the patient for prevention of side effects from substance abuse as needed. The SN continues the educational process by reinforcing prior teaching, initiating new teaching, and promoting the basic care and rehabilitation of the patient. The SW offers continued emotional support and is very effective in dealing with substance abuse problems by recommending alcohol rehabilitation. The CM arranges for nursing, rehabilitation, and speech therapy support as well as supplies and equipment for the patient's discharge. Rehabilitation staff is consulted as needed. This multidisciplinary team approach has been successful at improving quality of life, reducing complications, meeting educational needs, reducing length of stay, and rehabilitating patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:04Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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