2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165576
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PICC Program Development: Begin Within
Author(s):
Visser, Josephine
Author Details:
Josephine Visser, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USA
Abstract:
Securing adequate patient vascular access is a challenge faced by many oncology nurses. Patients have poor vasculature for a variety of reasons, often compounded by their disease process and treatment. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have grown in popularity over the past decade as one means to address vascular access in the oncology patient population. PICCs offer several advantages over other long-term central lines including lower costs and fewer complications associated with insertion. Additionally, PICCs can be inserted by specially educated nurses and placed at the bedside or in an outpatient setting. The purpose of this project is to describe the development and implementation of a PICC program, initially without additional FTEs, at our 162-bed, NCI comprehensive cancer center. The need for alternative methods of long-term vascular access prompted nursing leadership to investigate development and implementation of a PICC program. A consultant was hired to present an educational program to a group of nurses representing all areas of the hospital. From that group, two of the most experienced infusion nurses were identified to proceed through the credentialing process with the consultant. A team, which initially included a nursing director, clinical nurse specialist, and the two credentialed PICC nurses met regularly to develop policies, select inventory, create order and charge pathways, and implement a competency program. Perhaps their biggest challenge was determining how to schedule PICC placements throughout the week that would not interfere with the PICC nurses' primary roles in the outpatient infusion center. Since its inception, the PICC program has grown to four credentialed PICC nurses. Services are offered five days a week to both inpatients and outpatients. The PICC nurses continue their primary roles in the infusion center and integrate PICC placements into the work day. However, a 0.5 dedicated FTE has recently been approved for the program. Future challenges include focusing on our quality improvement program and enhanced marketing of the service. Implementation of a PICC program such as this does not necessarily require immediate addition of staff. In today's healthcare economy, a conservative approach offering a limited service initially, may yield the most favorable results.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePICC Program Development: Begin Withinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVisser, Josephineen_US
dc.author.detailsJosephine Visser, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165576-
dc.description.abstractSecuring adequate patient vascular access is a challenge faced by many oncology nurses. Patients have poor vasculature for a variety of reasons, often compounded by their disease process and treatment. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have grown in popularity over the past decade as one means to address vascular access in the oncology patient population. PICCs offer several advantages over other long-term central lines including lower costs and fewer complications associated with insertion. Additionally, PICCs can be inserted by specially educated nurses and placed at the bedside or in an outpatient setting. The purpose of this project is to describe the development and implementation of a PICC program, initially without additional FTEs, at our 162-bed, NCI comprehensive cancer center. The need for alternative methods of long-term vascular access prompted nursing leadership to investigate development and implementation of a PICC program. A consultant was hired to present an educational program to a group of nurses representing all areas of the hospital. From that group, two of the most experienced infusion nurses were identified to proceed through the credentialing process with the consultant. A team, which initially included a nursing director, clinical nurse specialist, and the two credentialed PICC nurses met regularly to develop policies, select inventory, create order and charge pathways, and implement a competency program. Perhaps their biggest challenge was determining how to schedule PICC placements throughout the week that would not interfere with the PICC nurses' primary roles in the outpatient infusion center. Since its inception, the PICC program has grown to four credentialed PICC nurses. Services are offered five days a week to both inpatients and outpatients. The PICC nurses continue their primary roles in the infusion center and integrate PICC placements into the work day. However, a 0.5 dedicated FTE has recently been approved for the program. Future challenges include focusing on our quality improvement program and enhanced marketing of the service. Implementation of a PICC program such as this does not necessarily require immediate addition of staff. In today's healthcare economy, a conservative approach offering a limited service initially, may yield the most favorable results.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:10Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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