2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165579
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cancer Treatment and Sexuality: The Un(ad)dressed Subject
Author(s):
Simmons, Sacha
Author Details:
Sacha Simmons, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
Sexual expression in cancer patients can lead to mental and physical well being and improved quality of life. Aggressive chemotherapy for patients with hematological malignancies can have a profound impact on their sexuality. Despite this, the healthcare team rarely discusses the impact of cancer and its treatment on patient sexual well being. Nurses at our NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center recognized that this lack of knowledge limited patient abilities to make informed and safe decisions about their sexual activities. However, they expressed concerns about their own lack of knowledge and confidence in the area of sexuality. Because patients are often overwhelmed with a life-threatening diagnosis, nurses may not perceive sexuality as a priority. Without a guideline, patients may receive inadequate information from healthcare providers. The use of a standard guideline increases nurse confidence and improves quality and consistency of teaching patients about the effects of treatment on their sexuality. This is a three-phased program: Investigation, intervention, and re-assessment. In the investigation phase, questionnaires completed by patients and nurses assess current practices regarding patient teaching about sexuality. This information will assist nurses in developing standard teaching guidelines. The intervention phase consists of three staff education sessions. The first session teaches how to initiate a discussion about sexuality and perform a sexuality assessment. The second session teaches nurses to identify specific treatment that may directly or indirectly affect patient sexuality. The third session focuses on safety and modifications of sexual activities that are necessary to prevent complications such as infection or bleeding. In order to maintain consistency in teaching sexuality, these guidelines will be shared with other members of the healthcare team. The re-assessment phase will be conducted one month after the completion of the teaching sessions. The questionnaire, again completed by patients and nurses, will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention. The development, implementation, and evaluation of this program will be presented including the questionnaire and content of the teaching session.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCancer Treatment and Sexuality: The Un(ad)dressed Subjecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Sachaen_US
dc.author.detailsSacha Simmons, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165579-
dc.description.abstractSexual expression in cancer patients can lead to mental and physical well being and improved quality of life. Aggressive chemotherapy for patients with hematological malignancies can have a profound impact on their sexuality. Despite this, the healthcare team rarely discusses the impact of cancer and its treatment on patient sexual well being. Nurses at our NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center recognized that this lack of knowledge limited patient abilities to make informed and safe decisions about their sexual activities. However, they expressed concerns about their own lack of knowledge and confidence in the area of sexuality. Because patients are often overwhelmed with a life-threatening diagnosis, nurses may not perceive sexuality as a priority. Without a guideline, patients may receive inadequate information from healthcare providers. The use of a standard guideline increases nurse confidence and improves quality and consistency of teaching patients about the effects of treatment on their sexuality. This is a three-phased program: Investigation, intervention, and re-assessment. In the investigation phase, questionnaires completed by patients and nurses assess current practices regarding patient teaching about sexuality. This information will assist nurses in developing standard teaching guidelines. The intervention phase consists of three staff education sessions. The first session teaches how to initiate a discussion about sexuality and perform a sexuality assessment. The second session teaches nurses to identify specific treatment that may directly or indirectly affect patient sexuality. The third session focuses on safety and modifications of sexual activities that are necessary to prevent complications such as infection or bleeding. In order to maintain consistency in teaching sexuality, these guidelines will be shared with other members of the healthcare team. The re-assessment phase will be conducted one month after the completion of the teaching sessions. The questionnaire, again completed by patients and nurses, will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention. The development, implementation, and evaluation of this program will be presented including the questionnaire and content of the teaching session.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:13Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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