2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165584
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Leukemia Care Pathway and Patient Recovery
Author(s):
Williamson, Lilibeth
Author Details:
Lilibeth Williamson, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Leukemia is one of the cancers for which we have few effective treatments leading to a cure. Currently we are seeing an explosion in phase I and II studies because of efforts to get potentially effective treatments to patients faster. The drugs in these trials are sometimes very toxic requiring constant monitoring and support. The most significant complication in this patient population is infection. At MDACC, we instruct the patients in the self-care that maximizes function, but as blood counts reach nadir, compliance diminishes. We believed that if the patient completed the prescribed care behaviors and assumed responsibility for checking off the care as it was done, we would have a higher rate of compliance resulting in fewer infections and decreased re-admissions. Several staff nurses volunteered to work with the CNS to improve patient compliance and outcomes. The outcome measures were length of stay (LOS), visits to the emergency center (EC) within three days of discharge, and the presence of fungal pneumonia. A "Leukemia Pathway to Recovery" booklet was developed. It incorporated oral care, prevention of pulmonary infection, diet, pain management, safety, and the patient goals. Three supplementary forms were also given to the patient on admission: "The Patient's Daily Worksheet," "Your Blood Counts," and "Discharge Care." After the patient completed their care activities, they filled out the daily work sheet; it was collected and replaced everyday. "Your Blood Counts" and "Discharge Care" provided the patient with the information about when to call the nurse and what could be expected when they go home. Preliminary data from one unit (N = 28) show LOS decreased from 9.19 to 7.48. Return visits to the EC decreased by 50% on the participating unit, and remained the same on the non-participating unit (N = 58). Information on occurrence of fungal infections is not available at this time. Mouth care, breathing treatments, and maintenance of mobility are important care issues for the patient receiving phase I and II therapies. Increased patient involvement in daily care will improve patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Leukemia Care Pathway and Patient Recoveryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Lilibethen_US
dc.author.detailsLilibeth Williamson, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165584-
dc.description.abstractLeukemia is one of the cancers for which we have few effective treatments leading to a cure. Currently we are seeing an explosion in phase I and II studies because of efforts to get potentially effective treatments to patients faster. The drugs in these trials are sometimes very toxic requiring constant monitoring and support. The most significant complication in this patient population is infection. At MDACC, we instruct the patients in the self-care that maximizes function, but as blood counts reach nadir, compliance diminishes. We believed that if the patient completed the prescribed care behaviors and assumed responsibility for checking off the care as it was done, we would have a higher rate of compliance resulting in fewer infections and decreased re-admissions. Several staff nurses volunteered to work with the CNS to improve patient compliance and outcomes. The outcome measures were length of stay (LOS), visits to the emergency center (EC) within three days of discharge, and the presence of fungal pneumonia. A "Leukemia Pathway to Recovery" booklet was developed. It incorporated oral care, prevention of pulmonary infection, diet, pain management, safety, and the patient goals. Three supplementary forms were also given to the patient on admission: "The Patient's Daily Worksheet," "Your Blood Counts," and "Discharge Care." After the patient completed their care activities, they filled out the daily work sheet; it was collected and replaced everyday. "Your Blood Counts" and "Discharge Care" provided the patient with the information about when to call the nurse and what could be expected when they go home. Preliminary data from one unit (N = 28) show LOS decreased from 9.19 to 7.48. Return visits to the EC decreased by 50% on the participating unit, and remained the same on the non-participating unit (N = 58). Information on occurrence of fungal infections is not available at this time. Mouth care, breathing treatments, and maintenance of mobility are important care issues for the patient receiving phase I and II therapies. Increased patient involvement in daily care will improve patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:18Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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