Yoga as a Clinical Intervention for Oncology Patients in an Ambulatory Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165585
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Yoga as a Clinical Intervention for Oncology Patients in an Ambulatory Setting
Author(s):
Ott, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Ott, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Background: People living with cancer have specific and unique self-care needs as a result of diagnostic and treatment procedures including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Studies have shown that pain, fatigue, insomnia, and depression are among the common symptoms experienced by oncology patients. Yoga is an ancient practice of breathing, gentle movement, meditation, chanting, and relaxation that supports health and healing. Studies have demonstrated its efficacy as an adjunct treatment in hypertension, cardiovascular disease, asthma, anxiety, depression, and other illnesses. Intervention: A series of one hour introductory yoga classes were developed and offered to patients in a large academic cancer treatment ambulatory setting. Patients were invited to attend a series of six classes or to attend individual classes, as they were able to do so. The classes were designed to teach and promote breath awareness, abdominal breathing, gentle physical movement, flexibility, meditation, and deep relaxation. An advanced practice nurse and a social worker, each of whom are certified yoga instructors, taught the classes. Evaluation: Self-report evaluations at the end of each of the classes indicated that the participants found the classes to be most helpful. They also reported feeling more calm and relaxed and were pleased to find that they were able to move their bodies more fully. Over time, participants described feeling more comfortable with their bodies and less stressed in general. They reported being able to use breathing and gentle movement outside of class to promote health and well being. Additionally, they reported sleeping better and having an increased sense of well being. Discussion: People living with cancer have unique self-care needs during initial diagnostic work ups and required treatments. As oncology nurses we are consistently faced with the challenge of finding safe, innovative ways to support people through stressful therapies and to promote healing on all levels. Yoga is an appropriate clinical intervention for some oncology patients that can result in a decrease in symptom burden and an improved quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYoga as a Clinical Intervention for Oncology Patients in an Ambulatory Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOtt, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Ott, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165585-
dc.description.abstractBackground: People living with cancer have specific and unique self-care needs as a result of diagnostic and treatment procedures including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Studies have shown that pain, fatigue, insomnia, and depression are among the common symptoms experienced by oncology patients. Yoga is an ancient practice of breathing, gentle movement, meditation, chanting, and relaxation that supports health and healing. Studies have demonstrated its efficacy as an adjunct treatment in hypertension, cardiovascular disease, asthma, anxiety, depression, and other illnesses. Intervention: A series of one hour introductory yoga classes were developed and offered to patients in a large academic cancer treatment ambulatory setting. Patients were invited to attend a series of six classes or to attend individual classes, as they were able to do so. The classes were designed to teach and promote breath awareness, abdominal breathing, gentle physical movement, flexibility, meditation, and deep relaxation. An advanced practice nurse and a social worker, each of whom are certified yoga instructors, taught the classes. Evaluation: Self-report evaluations at the end of each of the classes indicated that the participants found the classes to be most helpful. They also reported feeling more calm and relaxed and were pleased to find that they were able to move their bodies more fully. Over time, participants described feeling more comfortable with their bodies and less stressed in general. They reported being able to use breathing and gentle movement outside of class to promote health and well being. Additionally, they reported sleeping better and having an increased sense of well being. Discussion: People living with cancer have unique self-care needs during initial diagnostic work ups and required treatments. As oncology nurses we are consistently faced with the challenge of finding safe, innovative ways to support people through stressful therapies and to promote healing on all levels. Yoga is an appropriate clinical intervention for some oncology patients that can result in a decrease in symptom burden and an improved quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:19Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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