A Skin Care Protocol for Adult Bone Marrow/Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant (BM/PSCT) Patient

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165586
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Skin Care Protocol for Adult Bone Marrow/Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant (BM/PSCT) Patient
Author(s):
Abbott, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Abbott, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
Abstract:
The skin is the body's largest organ and serves several important protective functions including being a barrier to toxins, chemicals, mechanical and aqueous assaults, and for sensations such as touch, temperature, and pressure. The mild acidity of the skin is an effective antimicrobial barrier. Sebum also has been identified to have natural fungicidal and bactericidal properties. Maintaining this natural defensive mechanism against bacterial invasion is important. If the integrity of the skin is broken, it creates not only a portal for the entry of infectious organisms but also loss of fluids and electrolytes. Most soaps are alkaline with a pH of as high as 10-12 which can destroy sebum. Drying of the skin can also interfere with skin integrity. In order to decrease transepidermal water loss, which can result in dryness and flaking of the skin, baths should be followed by an emollient to wet skin. People undergoing a BM/PSCT are at risk for skin breakdown and subsequent infection as a result of GVHD, treatment related skin changes, pressure, irritation, or infectious complications. It is imperative to maintain skin integrity to afford the best protection from infection for this high risk population. Traditional skin cleaning in the BM/PSCT patient has included showering and washing hands with antimicrobial (chlorhexidine) soap used to eliminate the normal flora of the skin and thereby reduce the risk of infectious organisms on the skin. Chlorhexidine, though bacteriocidal, also washes away the sebum and the acid mantle is disrupted. Chlorhexidine is also drying and can result in flaking, cracking, and peeling of the skin. With the advent of bag baths, some immunocompromised patients are currently bathed with a cleanser other than chlorhexidine with no increase in infection rates or skin related complications. The purpose of this project is to look at the incidence of skin drying, flaking, cracking, and infection when comparing traditional skin cleansing practice to the use of a pH balanced, non-antimicrobial skin cleanser such as Dove soap or Cetaphil. The hypotheses is that there will be no increase in infection rates with the use of a non-antibacterial cleanser and that there will be a decrease in dryness, flaking, and cracking of the skin. This is a work in progress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Skin Care Protocol for Adult Bone Marrow/Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant (BM/PSCT) Patienten_GB
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Abbott, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165586-
dc.description.abstractThe skin is the body's largest organ and serves several important protective functions including being a barrier to toxins, chemicals, mechanical and aqueous assaults, and for sensations such as touch, temperature, and pressure. The mild acidity of the skin is an effective antimicrobial barrier. Sebum also has been identified to have natural fungicidal and bactericidal properties. Maintaining this natural defensive mechanism against bacterial invasion is important. If the integrity of the skin is broken, it creates not only a portal for the entry of infectious organisms but also loss of fluids and electrolytes. Most soaps are alkaline with a pH of as high as 10-12 which can destroy sebum. Drying of the skin can also interfere with skin integrity. In order to decrease transepidermal water loss, which can result in dryness and flaking of the skin, baths should be followed by an emollient to wet skin. People undergoing a BM/PSCT are at risk for skin breakdown and subsequent infection as a result of GVHD, treatment related skin changes, pressure, irritation, or infectious complications. It is imperative to maintain skin integrity to afford the best protection from infection for this high risk population. Traditional skin cleaning in the BM/PSCT patient has included showering and washing hands with antimicrobial (chlorhexidine) soap used to eliminate the normal flora of the skin and thereby reduce the risk of infectious organisms on the skin. Chlorhexidine, though bacteriocidal, also washes away the sebum and the acid mantle is disrupted. Chlorhexidine is also drying and can result in flaking, cracking, and peeling of the skin. With the advent of bag baths, some immunocompromised patients are currently bathed with a cleanser other than chlorhexidine with no increase in infection rates or skin related complications. The purpose of this project is to look at the incidence of skin drying, flaking, cracking, and infection when comparing traditional skin cleansing practice to the use of a pH balanced, non-antimicrobial skin cleanser such as Dove soap or Cetaphil. The hypotheses is that there will be no increase in infection rates with the use of a non-antibacterial cleanser and that there will be a decrease in dryness, flaking, and cracking of the skin. This is a work in progress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:20Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.