Making Each Moment Count: Developing a Diversional Therapies Program for Patients With Hemotologic Malignancies

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165587
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making Each Moment Count: Developing a Diversional Therapies Program for Patients With Hemotologic Malignancies
Author(s):
Haley, Kristen
Author Details:
Kristen Haley, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
Patients with hematological malignancies receive intensive chemotherapy and are frequently hospitalized for extended periods of time. Side effects of therapy include nausea, vomiting, pain, and fatigue. Patients are often fearful and depressed. Depression is partially due to feeling isolated, helpless, out of control, or unable to improve an adverse situation (Hirsh, S. & Meckes, D., 2000). Boredom, a less recognized problem, may have the same causes as depression. Severely immunocompromised patients are placed in private rooms with the doors closed. This isolates them, limits their activities, and decreases their opportunity to interact with other patients. Carpenito (1982) defines diversional activity deficit as "the state in which the individual experiences, or is at risk for experiencing, an environment that is devoid of stimulation or interest." Nurses recognized that boredom was a problem and believed a lack of diversion was a contributing factor. A Diversional Therapies Committee was formed to create a volunteer program and develop appropriate diversional activities. The committee solicited donations of books, cassettes, CDs, games, and VCRs for each patient room and, with others, generated unique activities such as walking and golf putting competitions. They met with rehabilitation staff to expand their role in these therapies. Social workers, occupational therapists, and nurses initiated a discussion/support group for patients. This enabled patients to share experiences and learn coping techniques such as relaxation and meditation and other activities based on patients' expressed interests. Barriers faced in implementing this program included a lack of financial support, inadequate space, and inconsistent volunteers. A future goal is to evaluate the effects of diversional therapies on patient depression, nausea, pain, and fatigue. We are confident that this will justify additional support for this program including funding an activity coordinator, designated space, and additional materials. We are improving our volunteer screening process for time commitment and emphasizing their importance in the diversional therapies program. Our experience has demonstrated the importance of these activities to the overall care of our patients. There is a great deal of enthusiasm among the staff, patients, and other disciplines. We believe other oncology nurses can learn from our experiences in establishing a diversional therapies program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking Each Moment Count: Developing a Diversional Therapies Program for Patients With Hemotologic Malignanciesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaley, Kristenen_US
dc.author.detailsKristen Haley, Johns Hopkins University, School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165587-
dc.description.abstractPatients with hematological malignancies receive intensive chemotherapy and are frequently hospitalized for extended periods of time. Side effects of therapy include nausea, vomiting, pain, and fatigue. Patients are often fearful and depressed. Depression is partially due to feeling isolated, helpless, out of control, or unable to improve an adverse situation (Hirsh, S. & Meckes, D., 2000). Boredom, a less recognized problem, may have the same causes as depression. Severely immunocompromised patients are placed in private rooms with the doors closed. This isolates them, limits their activities, and decreases their opportunity to interact with other patients. Carpenito (1982) defines diversional activity deficit as "the state in which the individual experiences, or is at risk for experiencing, an environment that is devoid of stimulation or interest." Nurses recognized that boredom was a problem and believed a lack of diversion was a contributing factor. A Diversional Therapies Committee was formed to create a volunteer program and develop appropriate diversional activities. The committee solicited donations of books, cassettes, CDs, games, and VCRs for each patient room and, with others, generated unique activities such as walking and golf putting competitions. They met with rehabilitation staff to expand their role in these therapies. Social workers, occupational therapists, and nurses initiated a discussion/support group for patients. This enabled patients to share experiences and learn coping techniques such as relaxation and meditation and other activities based on patients' expressed interests. Barriers faced in implementing this program included a lack of financial support, inadequate space, and inconsistent volunteers. A future goal is to evaluate the effects of diversional therapies on patient depression, nausea, pain, and fatigue. We are confident that this will justify additional support for this program including funding an activity coordinator, designated space, and additional materials. We are improving our volunteer screening process for time commitment and emphasizing their importance in the diversional therapies program. Our experience has demonstrated the importance of these activities to the overall care of our patients. There is a great deal of enthusiasm among the staff, patients, and other disciplines. We believe other oncology nurses can learn from our experiences in establishing a diversional therapies program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:21Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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