Predictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165588
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Ingram, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Ingram, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: ingramc@mcmaster.ca
Abstract:
Weight gain is common in early breast cancer, and has been linked to risk of early recurrence, later chronic diseases, and impaired adjustment. The author hypothesized that newer, adjuvant chemotherapies had changed this problem over time. Furthermore, premenopausal women have historically gained the most weight, but have been under-represented in past research. Brown's Conceptual Framework for Cancer-Related Weight Change provided the direction for this study. It supports the belief that weight change ultimately results from changes in energy balance and that these must be understood before interventions are planned. The purposes of this correlational, longitudinal study were to examine the rate and magnitude of breast cancer-associated weight change, to detect changes in body composition and selected energy balance factors, and to determine the relationship between these energy balance factors and weight change. An inception cohort of 91 premenopausal, stage I and II women with breast cancer was assembled. Baseline measures were collected before adjuvant chemotherapy began, and subsequent data were collected at the start of every other treatment cycle. Predictor variables included dietary intake (Block 98 Food Questionnaire), physical activity (Stanford Five Cities Project Questionnaire), resting energy expenditure (derived from bioimpedance analyses), menopausal symptoms (adapted version of Cooper & Baird's Menstrual Status Questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha = .70), and nicotine intake (self-reported smoking rates). Weights and heights were obtained using standardized techniques. Results indicated that weight gain during adjuvant chemotherapy is not the problem it once was. Of the sample, 55% maintained stable weights while 34% gained and 11% lost weight. Subject mean weight gain was 1.4 kg. Weight gainers and losers gained or lost three to four times as much fat as lean body mass. Physical activity and dietary intake decreased for both weight gainers and losers. The independent variables predicted 31% of the variance in weight. Future studies should examine relationships between treatment-related weight change, diet history, and post-treatment weight change. Subgroups at risk also require further study. These findings identified associations between breast cancer-associated weight change and changes in energy balance. They lay the ground work for identifying patients at risk and designing interventions that are targeted to risk profiles.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women With Early-Stage Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorIngram, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Ingram, Assistant Professor, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, email: ingramc@mcmaster.caen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165588-
dc.description.abstractWeight gain is common in early breast cancer, and has been linked to risk of early recurrence, later chronic diseases, and impaired adjustment. The author hypothesized that newer, adjuvant chemotherapies had changed this problem over time. Furthermore, premenopausal women have historically gained the most weight, but have been under-represented in past research. Brown's Conceptual Framework for Cancer-Related Weight Change provided the direction for this study. It supports the belief that weight change ultimately results from changes in energy balance and that these must be understood before interventions are planned. The purposes of this correlational, longitudinal study were to examine the rate and magnitude of breast cancer-associated weight change, to detect changes in body composition and selected energy balance factors, and to determine the relationship between these energy balance factors and weight change. An inception cohort of 91 premenopausal, stage I and II women with breast cancer was assembled. Baseline measures were collected before adjuvant chemotherapy began, and subsequent data were collected at the start of every other treatment cycle. Predictor variables included dietary intake (Block 98 Food Questionnaire), physical activity (Stanford Five Cities Project Questionnaire), resting energy expenditure (derived from bioimpedance analyses), menopausal symptoms (adapted version of Cooper & Baird's Menstrual Status Questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha = .70), and nicotine intake (self-reported smoking rates). Weights and heights were obtained using standardized techniques. Results indicated that weight gain during adjuvant chemotherapy is not the problem it once was. Of the sample, 55% maintained stable weights while 34% gained and 11% lost weight. Subject mean weight gain was 1.4 kg. Weight gainers and losers gained or lost three to four times as much fat as lean body mass. Physical activity and dietary intake decreased for both weight gainers and losers. The independent variables predicted 31% of the variance in weight. Future studies should examine relationships between treatment-related weight change, diet history, and post-treatment weight change. Subgroups at risk also require further study. These findings identified associations between breast cancer-associated weight change and changes in energy balance. They lay the ground work for identifying patients at risk and designing interventions that are targeted to risk profiles.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:22Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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