Effect of Nutritional Intervention After Hospital Stay Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165590
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Nutritional Intervention After Hospital Stay Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant
Author(s):
Quesada, Ofelia
Author Details:
Ofelia Quesada, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Between April 1996 and April 1997 at this NCI-funded cancer center, a retrospective review of 20 allogeneic stem cell transplant patients without documented GI pathology revealed they had a significant weight loss after discharge from the hospital. A multidisciplinary team consisting of clinical nutrition nurse clinicians, bone marrow transplant nurse clinicians, registered dietitians, pharmacist, the director of the clinical nutrition team, and a bone marrow transplant attending physician was organized to determine if early nutritional intervention would improve quality of life and morbidity. Studies have shown that unintentional weight loss >/-10% is an independent factor for morbidity and survival after peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Between March 2000 and March 2001, a cohort of 22 patients without documented GI pathology were enrolled in the study. Age ranged from 22-55 years (mean 37.64 years). Twenty of 22 patients received chemotherapy and total body irradiation and two received chemotherapy alone. All were given nutritional counseling consisting of 24-hour calorie counts, dietary recommendations such as high calorie dietary supplements, and counseling by a pharmacist to evaluate drug-nutrient interaction prior to discharge and at one, three, and six-month clinic visits. Feeding tube placement was recommended for those who sustained greater than 5% weight loss. Sixteen patients completed this intervention. Six patients died before this review was completed. Of the survivors, 10 had sustained weight loss at one and three months, and six patients maintained their weight throughout the intervention period. At six months, 62.5% of the patients, including four of the patients who initially lost weight, regained and/or maintained weight. This review revealed that although the majority of patients (62.5%) were able to maintain or regain weight by six months with close counseling and early intervention, more research is needed to evaluate which nutritional support measures will decrease or prevent the incidence of weight loss and improve recovery after transplantation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Nutritional Intervention After Hospital Stay Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplanten_GB
dc.contributor.authorQuesada, Ofeliaen_US
dc.author.detailsOfelia Quesada, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165590-
dc.description.abstractBetween April 1996 and April 1997 at this NCI-funded cancer center, a retrospective review of 20 allogeneic stem cell transplant patients without documented GI pathology revealed they had a significant weight loss after discharge from the hospital. A multidisciplinary team consisting of clinical nutrition nurse clinicians, bone marrow transplant nurse clinicians, registered dietitians, pharmacist, the director of the clinical nutrition team, and a bone marrow transplant attending physician was organized to determine if early nutritional intervention would improve quality of life and morbidity. Studies have shown that unintentional weight loss >/-10% is an independent factor for morbidity and survival after peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Between March 2000 and March 2001, a cohort of 22 patients without documented GI pathology were enrolled in the study. Age ranged from 22-55 years (mean 37.64 years). Twenty of 22 patients received chemotherapy and total body irradiation and two received chemotherapy alone. All were given nutritional counseling consisting of 24-hour calorie counts, dietary recommendations such as high calorie dietary supplements, and counseling by a pharmacist to evaluate drug-nutrient interaction prior to discharge and at one, three, and six-month clinic visits. Feeding tube placement was recommended for those who sustained greater than 5% weight loss. Sixteen patients completed this intervention. Six patients died before this review was completed. Of the survivors, 10 had sustained weight loss at one and three months, and six patients maintained their weight throughout the intervention period. At six months, 62.5% of the patients, including four of the patients who initially lost weight, regained and/or maintained weight. This review revealed that although the majority of patients (62.5%) were able to maintain or regain weight by six months with close counseling and early intervention, more research is needed to evaluate which nutritional support measures will decrease or prevent the incidence of weight loss and improve recovery after transplantation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:25Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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