Nonhormonal Management of Menopausal Symptoms: What is the Current Evidence?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165592
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nonhormonal Management of Menopausal Symptoms: What is the Current Evidence?
Author(s):
Gross, Randolph
Author Details:
Randolph Gross, MS/MSc, Clinical Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: glamorkit@aol.com
Abstract:
Nurses who practice within the specialty of women's health often are responsible for guiding women through the symptoms associated with menopause. These symptoms can occur due to natural menopause or through iatrogenic causes such as chemotherapy or radiation as treatment for cancer. Additionally, several of the drugs (e.g., tamoxifen, raloxifene) used widely have side effects that mimic menopausal symptoms, with the most prevalent being hot flashes. As survival statistics for women with cancer continue to improve due to early detection and advancements in treatment, this quality-of-life issue becomes paramount for many of these women. Furthermore, estrogen replacement is not an option for many of these women either by choice or due to possible increase in risk for recurrent disease. Thus, nurses need to have an understanding of the nonhormonal management of menopausal symptoms. Many of the interventions recommended for such symptom management presently are based more on anecdotal reports, though evidence-based practice is emerging. This presentation will discuss the current evidence on interventions such as diet, exercise, behavioral techniques, and nonhormonal medications, and will also address current knowledge regarding the various complementary therapies used by many women today. In order for nurses to provide the best possible care for the millions of women who are cancer survivors, knowledge regarding such interventions is necessary.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNonhormonal Management of Menopausal Symptoms: What is the Current Evidence?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGross, Randolphen_US
dc.author.detailsRandolph Gross, MS/MSc, Clinical Nurse, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: glamorkit@aol.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165592-
dc.description.abstractNurses who practice within the specialty of women's health often are responsible for guiding women through the symptoms associated with menopause. These symptoms can occur due to natural menopause or through iatrogenic causes such as chemotherapy or radiation as treatment for cancer. Additionally, several of the drugs (e.g., tamoxifen, raloxifene) used widely have side effects that mimic menopausal symptoms, with the most prevalent being hot flashes. As survival statistics for women with cancer continue to improve due to early detection and advancements in treatment, this quality-of-life issue becomes paramount for many of these women. Furthermore, estrogen replacement is not an option for many of these women either by choice or due to possible increase in risk for recurrent disease. Thus, nurses need to have an understanding of the nonhormonal management of menopausal symptoms. Many of the interventions recommended for such symptom management presently are based more on anecdotal reports, though evidence-based practice is emerging. This presentation will discuss the current evidence on interventions such as diet, exercise, behavioral techniques, and nonhormonal medications, and will also address current knowledge regarding the various complementary therapies used by many women today. In order for nurses to provide the best possible care for the millions of women who are cancer survivors, knowledge regarding such interventions is necessary.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:27Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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