The Importance of Quality-Improvement Surveys in Alleviating Pain in Patients Receiving Radiation Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165593
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Importance of Quality-Improvement Surveys in Alleviating Pain in Patients Receiving Radiation Treatment
Author(s):
Galperin, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon Galperin, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
A patient-satisfaction survey conducted by our institution showed that 55% of the patients were experiencing pain that interfered with their normal work. Patients experiencing pain do not always complain as they associate cancer with pain. Therefore, we needed to ask the patients about pain and devise a way to decrease pain and improve quality of life. The purpose of this project was to determine the percentage of radiation-treatment patients who had pain at a level of four or above on a pain scale of 0-10, the percentage experiencing good pain relief, and how the nurses could improve pain management for radiation-treatment patients. The radiation oncology nurses created a questionnaire that included questions to determine patient knowledge about their medications, their knowledge about alternative ways to decrease their level of pain, and whether or not they received printed pain-management materials. The questionnaire was distributed to 188 adult patients receiving radiation therapy on one day. The results indicated that not all patients experiencing pain felt they were getting good relief for their pain. The patients felt they understood how to take their pain medication but said they were not given verbal instructions on pain relief. The nursing staff reviewed the results and brainstormed on how they could change their approach to pain management. The nurses decided to ask all patients about pain, educate patients on pain management using printed materials, and inform the physicians when patients experienced pain at a level of four or greater. All the nurses attended a training session on pain management. The weekly documentation was reviewed to monitor documentation of pain management. The survey was repeated six weeks later. The second survey revealed that 19% fewer patients were experiencing pain at the level of four or greater. The patient understanding of pain management increased by 13%. It is vital for nurses to teach patients receiving radiation treatment about their pain and how it can be decreased or eliminated to improve quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Importance of Quality-Improvement Surveys in Alleviating Pain in Patients Receiving Radiation Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorGalperin, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon Galperin, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165593-
dc.description.abstractA patient-satisfaction survey conducted by our institution showed that 55% of the patients were experiencing pain that interfered with their normal work. Patients experiencing pain do not always complain as they associate cancer with pain. Therefore, we needed to ask the patients about pain and devise a way to decrease pain and improve quality of life. The purpose of this project was to determine the percentage of radiation-treatment patients who had pain at a level of four or above on a pain scale of 0-10, the percentage experiencing good pain relief, and how the nurses could improve pain management for radiation-treatment patients. The radiation oncology nurses created a questionnaire that included questions to determine patient knowledge about their medications, their knowledge about alternative ways to decrease their level of pain, and whether or not they received printed pain-management materials. The questionnaire was distributed to 188 adult patients receiving radiation therapy on one day. The results indicated that not all patients experiencing pain felt they were getting good relief for their pain. The patients felt they understood how to take their pain medication but said they were not given verbal instructions on pain relief. The nursing staff reviewed the results and brainstormed on how they could change their approach to pain management. The nurses decided to ask all patients about pain, educate patients on pain management using printed materials, and inform the physicians when patients experienced pain at a level of four or greater. All the nurses attended a training session on pain management. The weekly documentation was reviewed to monitor documentation of pain management. The survey was repeated six weeks later. The second survey revealed that 19% fewer patients were experiencing pain at the level of four or greater. The patient understanding of pain management increased by 13%. It is vital for nurses to teach patients receiving radiation treatment about their pain and how it can be decreased or eliminated to improve quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:28Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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