Physiological and Psychosocial Assessment Measures in Post-Breast-Cancer Lymphedema

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165598
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiological and Psychosocial Assessment Measures in Post-Breast-Cancer Lymphedema
Author(s):
Armer, Jane
Author Details:
Jane Armer, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Missouri-Columbia, Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, Missouri, USA, email: armer@missouri.edu
Abstract:
Post-breast cancer lymphedema is a chronic, distressful symptom that is poorly understood, acknowledged, and addressed by health providers. Accurate incidence and prevalence are elusive because it is under-reported, secondary to imprecise physiological measures generally used in clinical practice and common disregard for the serious impact on quality of life. The research goals were the (1) description of lymphedema prevalence through increased precision in physiological measurement; (2) description of lymphedema management through self-care and health system measures; and (3) identification of effects of lymphedema on quality of life, health locus of control, and overall adjustment to chronic illness. A descriptive-correlational cross-sectional study design was used to document the prevalence of lymphedema among 103 women treated for breast cancer at a Midwestern United States cancer center. Effects and management of lymphedema were explored among women with lymphedema using qualitative and quantitative measures. Certain psychological measures (quality of life, health locus of control, and overall adjustment to chronic illness) were compared among women with and without lymphedema to increase our understanding of the impact of lymphedema on women's well-being. Additional in-depth qualitative interviews were carried out with women with post-breast cancer lymphedema (N = 20) to assess onset, self-management, and impact on functional ability, family relationships, and quality of life. Further work is now completed comparing circumferences, water displacement, and infra-red laser perometry assessments of limb fluid volume in healthy women and breast cancer survivors (N = 80). These measures will be applied in an on-going prospective study of post-breast cancer lymphedema. A significant portion of the preparation for this study included the development of an assessment tool specific to lymphedema risk factors, identification, onset, and management. The self-care behaviors women used to relieve symptoms were addressed through semi-structured and open-ended questions. The goal was the development of a tool which is useful for scoring risk and guiding recommendations for self-care. Preliminary results, including tool and physiological measurement reliability, will be reported.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiological and Psychosocial Assessment Measures in Post-Breast-Cancer Lymphedemaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArmer, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsJane Armer, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Missouri-Columbia, Sinclair School of Nursing, Columbia, Missouri, USA, email: armer@missouri.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165598-
dc.description.abstractPost-breast cancer lymphedema is a chronic, distressful symptom that is poorly understood, acknowledged, and addressed by health providers. Accurate incidence and prevalence are elusive because it is under-reported, secondary to imprecise physiological measures generally used in clinical practice and common disregard for the serious impact on quality of life. The research goals were the (1) description of lymphedema prevalence through increased precision in physiological measurement; (2) description of lymphedema management through self-care and health system measures; and (3) identification of effects of lymphedema on quality of life, health locus of control, and overall adjustment to chronic illness. A descriptive-correlational cross-sectional study design was used to document the prevalence of lymphedema among 103 women treated for breast cancer at a Midwestern United States cancer center. Effects and management of lymphedema were explored among women with lymphedema using qualitative and quantitative measures. Certain psychological measures (quality of life, health locus of control, and overall adjustment to chronic illness) were compared among women with and without lymphedema to increase our understanding of the impact of lymphedema on women's well-being. Additional in-depth qualitative interviews were carried out with women with post-breast cancer lymphedema (N = 20) to assess onset, self-management, and impact on functional ability, family relationships, and quality of life. Further work is now completed comparing circumferences, water displacement, and infra-red laser perometry assessments of limb fluid volume in healthy women and breast cancer survivors (N = 80). These measures will be applied in an on-going prospective study of post-breast cancer lymphedema. A significant portion of the preparation for this study included the development of an assessment tool specific to lymphedema risk factors, identification, onset, and management. The self-care behaviors women used to relieve symptoms were addressed through semi-structured and open-ended questions. The goal was the development of a tool which is useful for scoring risk and guiding recommendations for self-care. Preliminary results, including tool and physiological measurement reliability, will be reported.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:34Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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