Outpatients' Titration and Evaluation of Oral Transmucosal Fentanyl Citrate (OTFC(r); ACTIQ(r)) for Breakthrough Pain (BTP)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165600
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outpatients' Titration and Evaluation of Oral Transmucosal Fentanyl Citrate (OTFC(r); ACTIQ(r)) for Breakthrough Pain (BTP)
Author(s):
Rice, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Rice, Kentucky Cancer Clinic, Hazard, Kentucky, USA,email: susankayrice@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Background: Breakthrough pain (BTP) is an unpredictable, transitory flare of pain superimposed on a background of chronic pain managed by around-the-clock opioids. ACTIQ (oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate; OTFC(r)) is a novel product designed to provide rapid analgesia for BTP in opioid-tolerant cancer patients. ACTIQ is available in six dosage strengths (200-1600 mcg), thus offering patients personalized control of BTP. The successful dose of ACTIQ is determined using an individualized titration process. Patients are instructed to titrate upward until one ACTIQ dose provides adequate BTP relief with minimal side effects ("successful titration"). Purpose: We conducted an 88-site, open-label study with cancer outpatients to characterize the titration process used in clinical practice and assess patient satisfaction with ACTIQ for management of BTP. Patients entered their titration experience information in a diary. Safety was evaluated collecting adverse events (AEs). Results: Over 19 months, 393 patients were enrolled. Summary statistics from initial data review were as follows. At baseline, 72% of patients were experiencing three or more BTP episodes/day; 44% were taking an oxycodone or hydrocodone combination product for BTP. At their physicians' discretion, patients started ACTIQ titration at 200 mcg (65%), 400 mcg (28%), 600 mcg (3%), or ³800 mcg (3%). Successful titration was reported by 60% of patients. Of these patients, 88% rated ACTIQ as better or much better overall and 91% rated ACTIQ as better or much better in speed of onset than their prior BTP therapy. Sixty-two percent reported they were better or much better able to perform daily physical activities and 93% planned to continue using ACTIQ to manage BTP. The most common reasons for discontinuation were AEs (11%), insufficient efficacy (10%), or other (19%). The most common AEs (at least possibly related to ACTIQ) were nausea (10%), somnolence (7%), taste perversion (7%), dry mouth (6%), and dizziness (6%). Conclusions: ACTIQ is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for cancer-related BTP. Based on these preliminary statistics, when successfully titrated, approximately nine out of every 10 of these cancer outpatients considered ACTIQ to be better and faster acting than their previous therapy and planned to continue using ACTIQ for BTP.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutpatients' Titration and Evaluation of Oral Transmucosal Fentanyl Citrate (OTFC(r); ACTIQ(r)) for Breakthrough Pain (BTP)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRice, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Rice, Kentucky Cancer Clinic, Hazard, Kentucky, USA,email: susankayrice@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165600-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Breakthrough pain (BTP) is an unpredictable, transitory flare of pain superimposed on a background of chronic pain managed by around-the-clock opioids. ACTIQ (oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate; OTFC(r)) is a novel product designed to provide rapid analgesia for BTP in opioid-tolerant cancer patients. ACTIQ is available in six dosage strengths (200-1600 mcg), thus offering patients personalized control of BTP. The successful dose of ACTIQ is determined using an individualized titration process. Patients are instructed to titrate upward until one ACTIQ dose provides adequate BTP relief with minimal side effects ("successful titration"). Purpose: We conducted an 88-site, open-label study with cancer outpatients to characterize the titration process used in clinical practice and assess patient satisfaction with ACTIQ for management of BTP. Patients entered their titration experience information in a diary. Safety was evaluated collecting adverse events (AEs). Results: Over 19 months, 393 patients were enrolled. Summary statistics from initial data review were as follows. At baseline, 72% of patients were experiencing three or more BTP episodes/day; 44% were taking an oxycodone or hydrocodone combination product for BTP. At their physicians' discretion, patients started ACTIQ titration at 200 mcg (65%), 400 mcg (28%), 600 mcg (3%), or ³800 mcg (3%). Successful titration was reported by 60% of patients. Of these patients, 88% rated ACTIQ as better or much better overall and 91% rated ACTIQ as better or much better in speed of onset than their prior BTP therapy. Sixty-two percent reported they were better or much better able to perform daily physical activities and 93% planned to continue using ACTIQ to manage BTP. The most common reasons for discontinuation were AEs (11%), insufficient efficacy (10%), or other (19%). The most common AEs (at least possibly related to ACTIQ) were nausea (10%), somnolence (7%), taste perversion (7%), dry mouth (6%), and dizziness (6%). Conclusions: ACTIQ is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for cancer-related BTP. Based on these preliminary statistics, when successfully titrated, approximately nine out of every 10 of these cancer outpatients considered ACTIQ to be better and faster acting than their previous therapy and planned to continue using ACTIQ for BTP.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:37Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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