Mucositis: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications for Clinical Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165605
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mucositis: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications for Clinical Practice
Author(s):
Douglas, Stacey
Author Details:
Stacey Douglas, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: Oral mucositis is a common severe side effect of cancer therapy which affects as many as 40% of cancer patients. Mucositis is often the dose-limiting toxicity of chemotherapy, as half of patients develop lesions of such severity to require dose modifications. In addition, mucositis affects nutritional intake, quality of life, pain level, infection and hospitalization rates, and overall survival. The incidence of mucositis is increasing as patients receive higher doses of chemotherapy. Therefore, nurses must be knowledgeable of preventive strategies and effective treatment options that are evidenced based. Outcomes, such as chemotherapy interruption and costs can be avoided if symptoms are successfully prevented or treated. The purpose of this literature review was to examine the evidence surrounding prevention and treatment of mucositis so that practice recommendations could be formulated. Theoretical Framework: The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the conceptual framework. A basic premise of this model is that an interrelatedness exists between the symptom experience (mucositis) and symptom outcomes (quality of life, treatment interruptions). Thus, careful assessment of each component is necessary for appropriate symptom management. Literature Review: MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, and CINAHL databases were searched for the past 10 years to identify articles pertaining to the prevention and treatment of mucositis. Data Analysis: Twelve articles were reviewed to determine the best methods for prevention and treatment based on evidence-based practice. Study design, methods, sample size, feasibility, benefits/risks, results, and costs were analyzed using Polit and Hungler criteria. Findings/Implications: Numerous remedies have been studied for the prevention and treatment of mucositis, but many results are conflicting. Research related to prevention has shown that regular oral hygiene can lower the incidence and severity of mucositis. However, research progress has been impeded by the lack of consistent practice assessment guidelines. Complete oral assessments need to be performed by oncology nurses prior to chemotherapy initiation so treatment of existing oral disease can be done. Research related to treatment showed that the best option remains unknown. Additional research surrounding these symptoms and their management is needed using randomized, double blind clinical trials to make conclusions that are clinically relevant and cost effective.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMucositis: A Review of the Research Literature and Implications for Clinical Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Staceyen_US
dc.author.detailsStacey Douglas, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165605-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Oral mucositis is a common severe side effect of cancer therapy which affects as many as 40% of cancer patients. Mucositis is often the dose-limiting toxicity of chemotherapy, as half of patients develop lesions of such severity to require dose modifications. In addition, mucositis affects nutritional intake, quality of life, pain level, infection and hospitalization rates, and overall survival. The incidence of mucositis is increasing as patients receive higher doses of chemotherapy. Therefore, nurses must be knowledgeable of preventive strategies and effective treatment options that are evidenced based. Outcomes, such as chemotherapy interruption and costs can be avoided if symptoms are successfully prevented or treated. The purpose of this literature review was to examine the evidence surrounding prevention and treatment of mucositis so that practice recommendations could be formulated. Theoretical Framework: The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the conceptual framework. A basic premise of this model is that an interrelatedness exists between the symptom experience (mucositis) and symptom outcomes (quality of life, treatment interruptions). Thus, careful assessment of each component is necessary for appropriate symptom management. Literature Review: MEDLINE, CANCERLIT, and CINAHL databases were searched for the past 10 years to identify articles pertaining to the prevention and treatment of mucositis. Data Analysis: Twelve articles were reviewed to determine the best methods for prevention and treatment based on evidence-based practice. Study design, methods, sample size, feasibility, benefits/risks, results, and costs were analyzed using Polit and Hungler criteria. Findings/Implications: Numerous remedies have been studied for the prevention and treatment of mucositis, but many results are conflicting. Research related to prevention has shown that regular oral hygiene can lower the incidence and severity of mucositis. However, research progress has been impeded by the lack of consistent practice assessment guidelines. Complete oral assessments need to be performed by oncology nurses prior to chemotherapy initiation so treatment of existing oral disease can be done. Research related to treatment showed that the best option remains unknown. Additional research surrounding these symptoms and their management is needed using randomized, double blind clinical trials to make conclusions that are clinically relevant and cost effective.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:42Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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