A Randomized Clinical Trial of Energy Conservation Training Versus Attentional Control During Cancer Treatment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165606
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Randomized Clinical Trial of Energy Conservation Training Versus Attentional Control During Cancer Treatment
Author(s):
Barsevick, Andrea
Author Details:
Andrea Barsevick, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: AM_Barsevick@fccc.edu
Abstract:
Cancer treatment-related fatigue, the most common and distressing side effect of cancer treatment, has profound effects on quality of life. Yet, research on interventions for managing fatigue has been limited to correcting chemotherapy-induced anemia or using aerobic exercise. Cognitive behavioral approaches often suggested in clinical practice such as energy conservation have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this research was to test the efficacy of energy conservation/activity management (ECAM) on perceived level of fatigue and selected domains of quality of life (functional status and mood) in adults undergoing cancer treatment. The Common Sense Model provided the conceptual basis for the study. In this randomized clinical trial, the ECAM group is compared to an attentional control (nutrition education). Valid and reliable measures of fatigue, functional status, negative mood, sleep disturbance, and other side effects of treatment are used to evaluate key variables at baseline and two follow-up points of expected high and low fatigue. Participants with breast, lung, colorectal, prostate, gynecologic, testicular cancer, or lymphoma receiving at least five to six weeks of radiation (RT), at least three cycles of chemotherapy (CTX), or combined therapy are included. When the trial is completed on October 31, 2001, 350 participants will be enrolled. Preliminary findings (N = 101) demonstrated significantly greater use of ECAM strategies (p = 0.03) and a trend toward lower fatigue (p = 0.09) in the experimental (ECAM) group. MANCOVA will be used to examine a group by time interaction to test the hypothesis that the ECAM group will have lower fatigue, lower negative mood, and better functioning than the control group. This unique study contributes to clinical practice by evaluating a commonly suggested intervention for cancer treatment-related fatigue that has never been systematically defined or tested. Studies such as this are critical in building the knowledge base for oncology nursing practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Randomized Clinical Trial of Energy Conservation Training Versus Attentional Control During Cancer Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarsevick, Andreaen_US
dc.author.detailsAndrea Barsevick, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: AM_Barsevick@fccc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165606-
dc.description.abstractCancer treatment-related fatigue, the most common and distressing side effect of cancer treatment, has profound effects on quality of life. Yet, research on interventions for managing fatigue has been limited to correcting chemotherapy-induced anemia or using aerobic exercise. Cognitive behavioral approaches often suggested in clinical practice such as energy conservation have not been systematically evaluated. The purpose of this research was to test the efficacy of energy conservation/activity management (ECAM) on perceived level of fatigue and selected domains of quality of life (functional status and mood) in adults undergoing cancer treatment. The Common Sense Model provided the conceptual basis for the study. In this randomized clinical trial, the ECAM group is compared to an attentional control (nutrition education). Valid and reliable measures of fatigue, functional status, negative mood, sleep disturbance, and other side effects of treatment are used to evaluate key variables at baseline and two follow-up points of expected high and low fatigue. Participants with breast, lung, colorectal, prostate, gynecologic, testicular cancer, or lymphoma receiving at least five to six weeks of radiation (RT), at least three cycles of chemotherapy (CTX), or combined therapy are included. When the trial is completed on October 31, 2001, 350 participants will be enrolled. Preliminary findings (N = 101) demonstrated significantly greater use of ECAM strategies (p = 0.03) and a trend toward lower fatigue (p = 0.09) in the experimental (ECAM) group. MANCOVA will be used to examine a group by time interaction to test the hypothesis that the ECAM group will have lower fatigue, lower negative mood, and better functioning than the control group. This unique study contributes to clinical practice by evaluating a commonly suggested intervention for cancer treatment-related fatigue that has never been systematically defined or tested. Studies such as this are critical in building the knowledge base for oncology nursing practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:43Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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