2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165610
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educational Poster Program for Patients Awaiting Radiation Treatment
Author(s):
Keaty, Maureen
Author Details:
Maureen Keaty, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Background/Rationale: Patients receive radiation therapy daily for several weeks. Waiting time can be long because of patient volume, complicated treatments, and technical issues. The nursing staff of a radiation oncology department in an urban tertiary care medical center was interested in devising a plan to creatively present information on managing side effects and preventative health practices in the waiting area. Posters, which are visually appealing and suitable for individuals who are illiterate, have been used in nonclinical academic areas as an adjunct to traditional teaching techniques. Therefore an educational poster program was developed and is currently in use as part of the educational strategy for patients in the department of radiation oncology. Program: The program includes posters covering patient education information on diverse topics. The posters are created on 30 x 40 inch colorful foam board. Key points are bulleted in large print and, when appropriate, posters include pictures or photographs. The posters are in a display frame on a table at the waiting room entrance, a highly trafficked area, and remain for several weeks. A variety of approaches are used including bilingual material, handouts, and audiovisual presentations. Perks such as food and giveaways add appeal. Poster topics to date have been "How to manage treatment related fatigue," "Questions to ask about clinical trials," "How to protect your skin from the sun," and "Brain Tumor Week." Additional posters are scheduled with topics such as pain, constipation, prevention of infection, and nutrition. Interpretation/Discussion: Both patients and staff have expressed positive comments on the content, presentation, and upbeat distraction that these posters provide. The driving force behind this project was the opportunity to create a fun environment for a captive audience. The radiation oncology nurses involved in this project appreciate the chance to provide additional education in an ordinarily passive experience and secondarily have the opportunity to acquire and demonstrate expertise in a subject area of their choice. Educational posters that are placed in a busy waiting area have a clear instructive message and are attractive to the eye, can capture patients' attention, and can turn time spent in the waiting room to productive learning time.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducational Poster Program for Patients Awaiting Radiation Treatmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeaty, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Keaty, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165610-
dc.description.abstractBackground/Rationale: Patients receive radiation therapy daily for several weeks. Waiting time can be long because of patient volume, complicated treatments, and technical issues. The nursing staff of a radiation oncology department in an urban tertiary care medical center was interested in devising a plan to creatively present information on managing side effects and preventative health practices in the waiting area. Posters, which are visually appealing and suitable for individuals who are illiterate, have been used in nonclinical academic areas as an adjunct to traditional teaching techniques. Therefore an educational poster program was developed and is currently in use as part of the educational strategy for patients in the department of radiation oncology. Program: The program includes posters covering patient education information on diverse topics. The posters are created on 30 x 40 inch colorful foam board. Key points are bulleted in large print and, when appropriate, posters include pictures or photographs. The posters are in a display frame on a table at the waiting room entrance, a highly trafficked area, and remain for several weeks. A variety of approaches are used including bilingual material, handouts, and audiovisual presentations. Perks such as food and giveaways add appeal. Poster topics to date have been "How to manage treatment related fatigue," "Questions to ask about clinical trials," "How to protect your skin from the sun," and "Brain Tumor Week." Additional posters are scheduled with topics such as pain, constipation, prevention of infection, and nutrition. Interpretation/Discussion: Both patients and staff have expressed positive comments on the content, presentation, and upbeat distraction that these posters provide. The driving force behind this project was the opportunity to create a fun environment for a captive audience. The radiation oncology nurses involved in this project appreciate the chance to provide additional education in an ordinarily passive experience and secondarily have the opportunity to acquire and demonstrate expertise in a subject area of their choice. Educational posters that are placed in a busy waiting area have a clear instructive message and are attractive to the eye, can capture patients' attention, and can turn time spent in the waiting room to productive learning time.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:47Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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