Risk-Reduction Strategies for Women at Increased Risk of Developing Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165611
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk-Reduction Strategies for Women at Increased Risk of Developing Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Lahl, Lynda
Author Details:
Lynda Lahl, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
Background: In 1999, the National Naval Medical Center's Breast Care Center (BCC), in conjunction with the National Cancer Institute, established a high-risk program for women identified as being at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Members of the high-risk team include a high-risk nurse coordinator, research nurse, medical oncologist, surgical oncologist, and nurse practitioner. Women identified at increased risk attend an education class on breast cancer risk. Following the class, women interested in a one-on-one appointment are scheduled to meet with a high-risk healthcare provider. Intervention: Approximately 200 women have attended the education class and been seen by a healthcare provider to discuss risk reduction options. During the visit, providers discuss appropriate interventions which may include surveillance, chemopreventive medication, chemoprevention research studies, genetic testing, and prophylactic mastectomy. Results: Thirty-seven percent of the women chose a chemopreventive agent, either with or without a research study. Fourteen percent of the women were not candidates for a chemoprevention agent due to a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or another medical problem. Almost half of the women chose high-risk breast surveillance. One woman opted to have bilateral prophylactic mastectomies. Discussion: Although high-risk women have new options available for risk reduction, less than half chose to take a chemoprevention agent. The BCC high-risk program offers women education and counseling on risk reduction options and allows women to participate in decisions on their health care. While chemoprevention is not a suitable choice for all women, every participant in the high-risk program is evaluated for this option. Nurses are an integral part of the high-risk program, assisting in the identification of women at increased risk and counseling women interested in learning more about their risk reduction options. Conclusion: The BCC high-risk program has empowered women to make a choice between appropriate risk reduction options. Oncology nurses should be able to identify available resources for high-risk women to assure participants receive appropriate counseling on current options. It is imperative that oncology nurses be able to discuss these choices so they can reinforce and clarify cancer risk reduction options.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk-Reduction Strategies for Women at Increased Risk of Developing Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorLahl, Lyndaen_US
dc.author.detailsLynda Lahl, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165611-
dc.description.abstractBackground: In 1999, the National Naval Medical Center's Breast Care Center (BCC), in conjunction with the National Cancer Institute, established a high-risk program for women identified as being at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Members of the high-risk team include a high-risk nurse coordinator, research nurse, medical oncologist, surgical oncologist, and nurse practitioner. Women identified at increased risk attend an education class on breast cancer risk. Following the class, women interested in a one-on-one appointment are scheduled to meet with a high-risk healthcare provider. Intervention: Approximately 200 women have attended the education class and been seen by a healthcare provider to discuss risk reduction options. During the visit, providers discuss appropriate interventions which may include surveillance, chemopreventive medication, chemoprevention research studies, genetic testing, and prophylactic mastectomy. Results: Thirty-seven percent of the women chose a chemopreventive agent, either with or without a research study. Fourteen percent of the women were not candidates for a chemoprevention agent due to a history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or another medical problem. Almost half of the women chose high-risk breast surveillance. One woman opted to have bilateral prophylactic mastectomies. Discussion: Although high-risk women have new options available for risk reduction, less than half chose to take a chemoprevention agent. The BCC high-risk program offers women education and counseling on risk reduction options and allows women to participate in decisions on their health care. While chemoprevention is not a suitable choice for all women, every participant in the high-risk program is evaluated for this option. Nurses are an integral part of the high-risk program, assisting in the identification of women at increased risk and counseling women interested in learning more about their risk reduction options. Conclusion: The BCC high-risk program has empowered women to make a choice between appropriate risk reduction options. Oncology nurses should be able to identify available resources for high-risk women to assure participants receive appropriate counseling on current options. It is imperative that oncology nurses be able to discuss these choices so they can reinforce and clarify cancer risk reduction options.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:48Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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