A Patient Orientation and Pretreatment Venous Assessment Program for Cancer Patients Beginning Chemotherapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165612
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Patient Orientation and Pretreatment Venous Assessment Program for Cancer Patients Beginning Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Roberson, Jean
Author Details:
Jean Roberson, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Rationale: Oncology nurses have recognized that the initial visit to the infusion unit is often the most difficult and anxiety-producing visit for patients and their families. Patients beginning treatment face tremendous stress: Being in an overwhelming environment and receiving treatment for a life-threatening disease that will change the way they feel, look, and function. Sometimes this difficult experience is exacerbated by poor venous access, necessitating numerous uncomfortable needle sticks. Infusion unit nurses at this urban NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center were concerned with patients beginning treatment and wanted to provide proactive versus reactive nursing care. Therefore, a formalized Patient Orientation and Pretreatment Venous Assessment Program (POPVAP) were piloted with patients from our women's cancers program. Program: The POPVAP includes a tour of the infusion unit, pre-chemotherapy venous assessment, and discussion with the patient and family. An infusion room nurse conducts the tour and reviews issues such as clinic procedures, geography of the unit, comfort measures, and available support services. The patient and family have an opportunity to ask questions and voice their concerns. The nurse also performs a pre-chemotherapy venous assessment. For patients with limited access to one arm, receiving chemotherapy is often a concern to the patient and a challenge to the nurse. If necessary, the patient's oncologist is contacted and a referral is made to place a central venous device before the first treatment. At the completion of the POPVAP visit, the nurse and patient complete an evaluation form. Discussion: Preliminary evaluation shows that patients find benefit in establishing an early relationship with an oncology nurse and having knowledge regarding the usual routine in the unit prior to the initiation of treatment. The issue of repeated needle sticks has also improved by the pre-treatment venous assessment with early referral for central venous devices. Due to this success, POPVAP continues and is expanding at our institution. We recommend oncology nurses at other cancer centers adopt a similar systematic program for new cancer patients beginning treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Patient Orientation and Pretreatment Venous Assessment Program for Cancer Patients Beginning Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoberson, Jeanen_US
dc.author.detailsJean Roberson, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165612-
dc.description.abstractRationale: Oncology nurses have recognized that the initial visit to the infusion unit is often the most difficult and anxiety-producing visit for patients and their families. Patients beginning treatment face tremendous stress: Being in an overwhelming environment and receiving treatment for a life-threatening disease that will change the way they feel, look, and function. Sometimes this difficult experience is exacerbated by poor venous access, necessitating numerous uncomfortable needle sticks. Infusion unit nurses at this urban NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center were concerned with patients beginning treatment and wanted to provide proactive versus reactive nursing care. Therefore, a formalized Patient Orientation and Pretreatment Venous Assessment Program (POPVAP) were piloted with patients from our women's cancers program. Program: The POPVAP includes a tour of the infusion unit, pre-chemotherapy venous assessment, and discussion with the patient and family. An infusion room nurse conducts the tour and reviews issues such as clinic procedures, geography of the unit, comfort measures, and available support services. The patient and family have an opportunity to ask questions and voice their concerns. The nurse also performs a pre-chemotherapy venous assessment. For patients with limited access to one arm, receiving chemotherapy is often a concern to the patient and a challenge to the nurse. If necessary, the patient's oncologist is contacted and a referral is made to place a central venous device before the first treatment. At the completion of the POPVAP visit, the nurse and patient complete an evaluation form. Discussion: Preliminary evaluation shows that patients find benefit in establishing an early relationship with an oncology nurse and having knowledge regarding the usual routine in the unit prior to the initiation of treatment. The issue of repeated needle sticks has also improved by the pre-treatment venous assessment with early referral for central venous devices. Due to this success, POPVAP continues and is expanding at our institution. We recommend oncology nurses at other cancer centers adopt a similar systematic program for new cancer patients beginning treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:49Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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