2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165613
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Structuring a Patient Education Program: The Journey Guide Project
Author(s):
Mazanec, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Mazanec, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Abstract:
Assuring consistent, high-quality patient education across the care continuum remains a challenge for oncology nurses. Forces in society and healthcare are driving the changes in delivery of patient education. Societal forces include the Internet, variable literacy, and patient autonomy in decision making. Healthcare forces include multiple entry points to the healthcare system, short hospital stays, complex treatment plans, numerous caregivers, and a nursing shortage. The overall goal of this program is to provide patient education that will empower patients and families to make informed healthcare decisions. Patient education begins at the time of diagnosis and is interdisciplinary. In 1999, the associate director for patient education at a NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center convened task forces consisting of nurses and other professionals caring for a particular patient population: Breast cancer, prostate cancer, lymphoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, head/neck cancer, pediatric cancer, and transplantation. Each task force met to discuss education needs of patients, share written materials, and define the standard for their population. They constructed a product to meet the standard. Six of the task forces designed educational binders for patients called "The Journey Guide." The binders consist of instruction sheets and booklets about diagnosis, treatment, clinical trials, nutrition, coping, self-care, resources, and complementary therapies. The binder and a journal are given to patients in tote bags after diagnosis or when they enter the hospital system. The binder format allows for tailoring of patient education and assists patients in organizing materials. Patients are instructed to use the binder as a reference throughout their cancer experience. Patient satisfaction surveys are mailed routinely to patients receiving "The Journey Guide." Results from the surveys are shared with the task force to improve the product. "The Journey Guide" product facilitates and streamlines the education process while defining a standard for patient education across multiple entry points. The product is tailored to individual learning needs and styles. Patient satisfaction is high. Benefits of the task force process include networking, team building, and creative problem solving. Utilizing interdisciplinary task forces is an effective way to define and implement patient education standards.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStructuring a Patient Education Program: The Journey Guide Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMazanec, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Mazanec, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165613-
dc.description.abstractAssuring consistent, high-quality patient education across the care continuum remains a challenge for oncology nurses. Forces in society and healthcare are driving the changes in delivery of patient education. Societal forces include the Internet, variable literacy, and patient autonomy in decision making. Healthcare forces include multiple entry points to the healthcare system, short hospital stays, complex treatment plans, numerous caregivers, and a nursing shortage. The overall goal of this program is to provide patient education that will empower patients and families to make informed healthcare decisions. Patient education begins at the time of diagnosis and is interdisciplinary. In 1999, the associate director for patient education at a NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center convened task forces consisting of nurses and other professionals caring for a particular patient population: Breast cancer, prostate cancer, lymphoma, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, head/neck cancer, pediatric cancer, and transplantation. Each task force met to discuss education needs of patients, share written materials, and define the standard for their population. They constructed a product to meet the standard. Six of the task forces designed educational binders for patients called "The Journey Guide." The binders consist of instruction sheets and booklets about diagnosis, treatment, clinical trials, nutrition, coping, self-care, resources, and complementary therapies. The binder and a journal are given to patients in tote bags after diagnosis or when they enter the hospital system. The binder format allows for tailoring of patient education and assists patients in organizing materials. Patients are instructed to use the binder as a reference throughout their cancer experience. Patient satisfaction surveys are mailed routinely to patients receiving "The Journey Guide." Results from the surveys are shared with the task force to improve the product. "The Journey Guide" product facilitates and streamlines the education process while defining a standard for patient education across multiple entry points. The product is tailored to individual learning needs and styles. Patient satisfaction is high. Benefits of the task force process include networking, team building, and creative problem solving. Utilizing interdisciplinary task forces is an effective way to define and implement patient education standards.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:50Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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