Information Needs Related to Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk: Targeting Educational Efforts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165616
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Information Needs Related to Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk: Targeting Educational Efforts
Author(s):
McCullum, Mary
Author Details:
Mary McCullum, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Hereditary Cancer Program, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Abstract:
Many women perceive themselves to be at high risk for developing breast cancer. Media reports of genetic discoveries (e.g., BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes) have heightened interest in genetic testing, often with unrealistic expectations. Oncology nurses are ideally positioned to implement cancer risk communication strategies that are responsive to women's needs and that support cost-effective use of genetic testing services. The purpose of this study was to assess women's interest in and knowledge of genetic testing for breast cancer risk in order to direct the development of appropriate education approaches. A telephone survey of women in one western Canadian province was conducted. Two random samples included 761 women from the general population who had never been diagnosed with breast cancer and 235 women from the provincial cancer registry who had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The survey included questions to assess awareness and knowledge of genetic testing, interest in and reasons for wanting testing, and factors associated with level of understanding and interest. Almost 50% of each sample had heard or read at least a fair amount about "breast cancer genes." Of the women with breast cancer, 30.8% reported interest in genetic testing compared with 28.5% of women without breast cancer. Breast cancer status, family history of breast cancer, years of education, and knowledge of genetic testing were significant predictors of interest in genetic testing. Significant interactions were found between breast cancer status and education, and knowledge of genetic testing and age. Women with breast cancer did not possess superior knowledge of breast cancer genetics compared with women from the general population, and critical gaps in knowledge were identified in both samples. Our findings support the importance of education approaches that address specific information needs. Tailoring strategies to match women's personal and family history of breast cancer, age, education, and knowledge of genetics will enhance effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformation Needs Related to Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk: Targeting Educational Effortsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcCullum, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary McCullum, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Hereditary Cancer Program, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canadaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165616-
dc.description.abstractMany women perceive themselves to be at high risk for developing breast cancer. Media reports of genetic discoveries (e.g., BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes) have heightened interest in genetic testing, often with unrealistic expectations. Oncology nurses are ideally positioned to implement cancer risk communication strategies that are responsive to women's needs and that support cost-effective use of genetic testing services. The purpose of this study was to assess women's interest in and knowledge of genetic testing for breast cancer risk in order to direct the development of appropriate education approaches. A telephone survey of women in one western Canadian province was conducted. Two random samples included 761 women from the general population who had never been diagnosed with breast cancer and 235 women from the provincial cancer registry who had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The survey included questions to assess awareness and knowledge of genetic testing, interest in and reasons for wanting testing, and factors associated with level of understanding and interest. Almost 50% of each sample had heard or read at least a fair amount about "breast cancer genes." Of the women with breast cancer, 30.8% reported interest in genetic testing compared with 28.5% of women without breast cancer. Breast cancer status, family history of breast cancer, years of education, and knowledge of genetic testing were significant predictors of interest in genetic testing. Significant interactions were found between breast cancer status and education, and knowledge of genetic testing and age. Women with breast cancer did not possess superior knowledge of breast cancer genetics compared with women from the general population, and critical gaps in knowledge were identified in both samples. Our findings support the importance of education approaches that address specific information needs. Tailoring strategies to match women's personal and family history of breast cancer, age, education, and knowledge of genetics will enhance effectiveness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:53Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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