The Effect of Education and Self-Care Behaviors of Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165618
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Education and Self-Care Behaviors of Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Schreier, Ann
Author Details:
Ann Schreier, East Carolina University, School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: schreieran@mail.ecu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose/specific aims: To determine the efficacy of informational audiotapes on patient self-care behaviors (SCB) and state anxiety during outpatient intravenous chemotherapy, and to describe the occurrence and intensity of common side effects (SE) and to determine the use of SCB in a group of patients with breast cancer. Design: Experimental. Setting: Outpatient chemotherapy clinics operated by a university center in a southeastern rural area. Sample: Seventy newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy. Randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Methods: Demographic data, a knowledge test, and the Speilberger State Trait Anxiety (STAI) prior to therapy. At one month and three months, the subjects completed the modified Nail Self-Care Diary (SCD) and the Speilberger State Anxiety Inventory (SAI). At fourth month, SAI, SCD, & a post-knowledge test. Research variable: Independent variable: Two 15-minute informational audiotapes on SCB for SE of chemotherapy. The dependent variables: State anxiety, severity of SE, and the use and efficacy of SCB. Findings: With repeated measures ANOVA, the control group exhibited a statistically significant higher level of state anxiety throughout the course of chemotherapy. Trait anxiety was not significantly different between groups. The most frequently experienced SE for the control and experimental groups were fatigue, nausea/vomiting, and taste change at cycle one and four. The highest severity ratings were for the SE of fatigue, taste change, and appetite loss at cycle one, and fatigue, constipation, and appetite loss at cycle four. There were no statistically significant differences in SCB performed by the control and experimental groups. The experimental group rated the efficacy of the SCB higher than the control group. Conclusions: The intervention did not stimulate more SCB. However, there were differences between groups in the use of more healthful and efficacious SCB. The intervention lowered state anxiety levels. Implications for practice: Time constraints on nursing time in busy clinics may decrease the length of time for teaching related to SE of chemotherapy. Audiotapes provide for patient education when anxiety is high in the clinic. Additional interventions and reinforcement need to be explored for effective education and for reducing anxiety levels.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Education and Self-Care Behaviors of Women Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchreier, Annen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Schreier, East Carolina University, School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: schreieran@mail.ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165618-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/specific aims: To determine the efficacy of informational audiotapes on patient self-care behaviors (SCB) and state anxiety during outpatient intravenous chemotherapy, and to describe the occurrence and intensity of common side effects (SE) and to determine the use of SCB in a group of patients with breast cancer. Design: Experimental. Setting: Outpatient chemotherapy clinics operated by a university center in a southeastern rural area. Sample: Seventy newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy. Randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Methods: Demographic data, a knowledge test, and the Speilberger State Trait Anxiety (STAI) prior to therapy. At one month and three months, the subjects completed the modified Nail Self-Care Diary (SCD) and the Speilberger State Anxiety Inventory (SAI). At fourth month, SAI, SCD, & a post-knowledge test. Research variable: Independent variable: Two 15-minute informational audiotapes on SCB for SE of chemotherapy. The dependent variables: State anxiety, severity of SE, and the use and efficacy of SCB. Findings: With repeated measures ANOVA, the control group exhibited a statistically significant higher level of state anxiety throughout the course of chemotherapy. Trait anxiety was not significantly different between groups. The most frequently experienced SE for the control and experimental groups were fatigue, nausea/vomiting, and taste change at cycle one and four. The highest severity ratings were for the SE of fatigue, taste change, and appetite loss at cycle one, and fatigue, constipation, and appetite loss at cycle four. There were no statistically significant differences in SCB performed by the control and experimental groups. The experimental group rated the efficacy of the SCB higher than the control group. Conclusions: The intervention did not stimulate more SCB. However, there were differences between groups in the use of more healthful and efficacious SCB. The intervention lowered state anxiety levels. Implications for practice: Time constraints on nursing time in busy clinics may decrease the length of time for teaching related to SE of chemotherapy. Audiotapes provide for patient education when anxiety is high in the clinic. Additional interventions and reinforcement need to be explored for effective education and for reducing anxiety levels.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:55Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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