2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165620
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Celebration of Hope: Chemotherapy Patient Graduation
Author(s):
Flaska, Rita
Author Details:
Rita Flaska, Loyola University Health System, Maywood, Illinois, USA
Abstract:
On the final day of chemotherapy the patient arrives, receives the treatment and obtains verbal congratulations on a job well done. This experience, after an arduous journey, is anticlimactic. The individual completing chemotherapy deserves the recognition of having done so. To honor these patients we looked at the similarities to a school class. With our treatment plans there is a syllabus of chemotherapeutic agents, education, a treatment calendar, and tests of IV insertions and phlebotomy culminating in the final treatment. Upon graduation from the difficult "school" of chemotherapy, we believe they should receive tangible proof of completion. The idea of a chemotherapy "Certificate of Completion" was born. Each certificate of completion is personalized and has a message of congratulations on a job well done. In addition to the communication of congratulations, we wanted to relay another message-the message of hope. The patients' strength to endure the toxic agents given to them is based on hope: Hope to survive, to be cured, to be in remission, and to live. Hence, the certificate is a symbol of their success and also a reminder to continue to have hope. In large bold print the words "Hope is Life" stream across the top of the bordered certificate. When the certificate is presented to the patient a graduation gift (a key ring with "Hope Is Life") is also given. Once the certificate was created, the need of support during and after treatment was addressed. Nurses give support throughout treatment and we wanted a tangible object to enhance our words of support. We chose a rock to exemplify strength and power while also being a little piece of art. A picture and a single word are hand painted (by staff members', families, and friends) on each rock. A variety of words such as faith, hope, pray, joy, and calm are easily readable. The patients select one at graduation or at a low point during their treatment. The rock, graduation gift, and certificate have enhanced the air of celebration at this very challenging time in the patients' lives.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Celebration of Hope: Chemotherapy Patient Graduationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlaska, Ritaen_US
dc.author.detailsRita Flaska, Loyola University Health System, Maywood, Illinois, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165620-
dc.description.abstractOn the final day of chemotherapy the patient arrives, receives the treatment and obtains verbal congratulations on a job well done. This experience, after an arduous journey, is anticlimactic. The individual completing chemotherapy deserves the recognition of having done so. To honor these patients we looked at the similarities to a school class. With our treatment plans there is a syllabus of chemotherapeutic agents, education, a treatment calendar, and tests of IV insertions and phlebotomy culminating in the final treatment. Upon graduation from the difficult "school" of chemotherapy, we believe they should receive tangible proof of completion. The idea of a chemotherapy "Certificate of Completion" was born. Each certificate of completion is personalized and has a message of congratulations on a job well done. In addition to the communication of congratulations, we wanted to relay another message-the message of hope. The patients' strength to endure the toxic agents given to them is based on hope: Hope to survive, to be cured, to be in remission, and to live. Hence, the certificate is a symbol of their success and also a reminder to continue to have hope. In large bold print the words "Hope is Life" stream across the top of the bordered certificate. When the certificate is presented to the patient a graduation gift (a key ring with "Hope Is Life") is also given. Once the certificate was created, the need of support during and after treatment was addressed. Nurses give support throughout treatment and we wanted a tangible object to enhance our words of support. We chose a rock to exemplify strength and power while also being a little piece of art. A picture and a single word are hand painted (by staff members', families, and friends) on each rock. A variety of words such as faith, hope, pray, joy, and calm are easily readable. The patients select one at graduation or at a low point during their treatment. The rock, graduation gift, and certificate have enhanced the air of celebration at this very challenging time in the patients' lives.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:21:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:21:58Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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