15.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165623
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Use of the Telephone for Delivery of Nursing Interventions
Author(s):
Whitmer, Kyra; Towsley, G.; Beck, S.
Author Details:
Kyra Whitmer, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: Kyra.Whitmer@UC.Edu; G. Towsley; S. Beck
Abstract:
Symptom management is a nursing practice issue. Patients with cancer experience often multiple symptoms that need to be addressed. However, current practice settings are often characterized by barriers, which impede nurse-patient interactions such as abbreviated length of stay and minimal staffing. Creative strategies to provide nursing interventions can facilitate effective symptom management. While carrying out a randomized trial of an intervention to manage cancer-related fatigue, the feasibility of using the telephone for the delivery of a nursing intervention was assessed. Specially trained oncology nurses delivered the nursing interventions during three weekly telephone sessions. Participants (n=396) with breast, lung, colorectal, prostate, gynecologic, testicular cancer or lymphoma and receiving either 5-6 weeks of radiation, 3 cycles of chemotherapy, or combined therapy were randomly assigned to receive either the ECAM (energy conservation and activity management ) or a nutrition intervention. Upon completion of participation, a random sample of 42 participants was surveyed with regard to their satisfaction with the telephone delivery of the nursing intervention. Study participants found the telephone delivery of nursing intervention to be both convenient and as effective as face to face contact with a nurse. Additionally, they found the information important and helpful and felt the number of telephone calls was appropriate. The telephone, one-on-one contact was valued by the participants and they would recommend it. More importantly, the participants used the information provided. Historically, practitioners have used the telephone as a vehicle for assessment, surveillance, and counseling. Use of the telephone to deliver nursing interventions is feasible, acceptable and effective. In light of the current health care constraints, the use of the telephone can extend the ability of the nurse to assist patients in managing their symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUse of the Telephone for Delivery of Nursing Interventionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhitmer, Kyraen_US
dc.contributor.authorTowsley, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeck, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsKyra Whitmer, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: Kyra.Whitmer@UC.Edu; G. Towsley; S. Becken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165623-
dc.description.abstractSymptom management is a nursing practice issue. Patients with cancer experience often multiple symptoms that need to be addressed. However, current practice settings are often characterized by barriers, which impede nurse-patient interactions such as abbreviated length of stay and minimal staffing. Creative strategies to provide nursing interventions can facilitate effective symptom management. While carrying out a randomized trial of an intervention to manage cancer-related fatigue, the feasibility of using the telephone for the delivery of a nursing intervention was assessed. Specially trained oncology nurses delivered the nursing interventions during three weekly telephone sessions. Participants (n=396) with breast, lung, colorectal, prostate, gynecologic, testicular cancer or lymphoma and receiving either 5-6 weeks of radiation, 3 cycles of chemotherapy, or combined therapy were randomly assigned to receive either the ECAM (energy conservation and activity management ) or a nutrition intervention. Upon completion of participation, a random sample of 42 participants was surveyed with regard to their satisfaction with the telephone delivery of the nursing intervention. Study participants found the telephone delivery of nursing intervention to be both convenient and as effective as face to face contact with a nurse. Additionally, they found the information important and helpful and felt the number of telephone calls was appropriate. The telephone, one-on-one contact was valued by the participants and they would recommend it. More importantly, the participants used the information provided. Historically, practitioners have used the telephone as a vehicle for assessment, surveillance, and counseling. Use of the telephone to deliver nursing interventions is feasible, acceptable and effective. In light of the current health care constraints, the use of the telephone can extend the ability of the nurse to assist patients in managing their symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:01Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.