2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165630
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Group Visits for Survivor Care: An Innovative Multi-Disciplinary Approach
Author(s):
Trotter, Kathy
Author Details:
Kathy Trotter, RN, CNM, FNP, Asst. clinical professor, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: trott004@mc.duke.edu
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Nurses can be important leaders in survivorship care. In this unique long term follow-up clinic, the Nurse Practitioner is both the lead facilitator for the small group session, as well as primary clinician in this multi-disciplinary team of APN, physical therapist, nutritionist and social worker. Both the team approach in this innovative survivor care clinic as well as enhanced patient empowerment are key points to this model. Practically speaking, the cancer center has many patients to care for with only so much space and clinical appointments available. To relieve the clinic schedule which was overpopulating the waiting room, help frustrated clinicians trying to make room for new cancer patients, and improve services to survivors with their unique needs, the new breast cancer survivor clinic was established at Duke Medicine in February, 2008. In this clinic, six women who are three years or more post diagnosis, arrive at the same time, and do not wait in the waiting room, but come into the group space area to begin care. The room is set up in a circle of chairs, and two vital signs stations. Women take their own vital signs and mark them on their long term Summary Care Plan, and by the end of the visit, write Personal Goals for the year. The 50-60 minute group session, adapted from the Centering Healthcare Institute model, is facilitated by the NP. The session includes all patients as well as their significant others, the nutritionist, the social worker and physical therapist. There is structure with the use of a Self Assessment Sheet, with versions available for the patient as well as their accompanying family member or friend. 148 patients attended this clinic during 2008. Data showed 96% satisfaction with the organization of their care in this way, with 94% responding that they learned some new things during the session, and 100% revealed that the long term care plan will be at least somewhat helpful. This model of survivor care demonstrates strong patient satisfaction with the group care model and the services offered. The cancer center is supported as this model creates openings for newly diagnosed patients. Further research is suggested on the model's effect on patient and system outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGroup Visits for Survivor Care: An Innovative Multi-Disciplinary Approachen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTrotter, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Trotter, RN, CNM, FNP, Asst. clinical professor, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: trott004@mc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165630-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Nurses can be important leaders in survivorship care. In this unique long term follow-up clinic, the Nurse Practitioner is both the lead facilitator for the small group session, as well as primary clinician in this multi-disciplinary team of APN, physical therapist, nutritionist and social worker. Both the team approach in this innovative survivor care clinic as well as enhanced patient empowerment are key points to this model. Practically speaking, the cancer center has many patients to care for with only so much space and clinical appointments available. To relieve the clinic schedule which was overpopulating the waiting room, help frustrated clinicians trying to make room for new cancer patients, and improve services to survivors with their unique needs, the new breast cancer survivor clinic was established at Duke Medicine in February, 2008. In this clinic, six women who are three years or more post diagnosis, arrive at the same time, and do not wait in the waiting room, but come into the group space area to begin care. The room is set up in a circle of chairs, and two vital signs stations. Women take their own vital signs and mark them on their long term Summary Care Plan, and by the end of the visit, write Personal Goals for the year. The 50-60 minute group session, adapted from the Centering Healthcare Institute model, is facilitated by the NP. The session includes all patients as well as their significant others, the nutritionist, the social worker and physical therapist. There is structure with the use of a Self Assessment Sheet, with versions available for the patient as well as their accompanying family member or friend. 148 patients attended this clinic during 2008. Data showed 96% satisfaction with the organization of their care in this way, with 94% responding that they learned some new things during the session, and 100% revealed that the long term care plan will be at least somewhat helpful. This model of survivor care demonstrates strong patient satisfaction with the group care model and the services offered. The cancer center is supported as this model creates openings for newly diagnosed patients. Further research is suggested on the model's effect on patient and system outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:08Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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