Depression in Face-to-Face and Internet Cancer Support Groups: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165632
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression in Face-to-Face and Internet Cancer Support Groups: A Pilot Study
Author(s):
Klemm, Paula
Author Details:
Paula Klemm, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Delaware, College of Health & Nursing Science, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: klemmpa@udel.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this pilot study was to examine depression in Internet and traditional (face-to-face) cancer support groups. Bandura's' Social Cognitive Theory formed the framework for this work. Subjects were recruited from traditional and Internet cancer support groups over a one-month period. The sample consisted of 40 cancer patients, 14 from traditional groups and 26 from an Internet cancer support group with different cancer diagnoses. The face-to-face group was 100% male and the online group was 56 percent male (n = 14) and 44 percent female (n = 12). Data collection instruments consisted of a researcher developed demographic survey and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The cutoff score for the diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder on the CES-D is 16. Findings revealed that the groups differed significantly on level of depression. The traditional (face-to-face) group had a mean score of 1.86 (SD = 2.69) on the CES-D and the online group had a mean score of 29.27 (SD = 11.89); p = 0.00). Ninety-two percent of the online group had CES-D scores that indicated depression, as compared to zero percent for the face-to-face groups. When CES-D scores were correlated to total time on the Internet, results indicated that depression rates decreased over time (p = 0.06). This study provided provocative data suggesting that more depressed patients with cancer use Internet support groups as compared to face-to-face support. Results may be explained by variance between the types of cancer, gender, or the self-selection of subjects participating in both groups. These factors limit applicability findings, as does the small sample size and lack of female participation in the face-to-face groups. Before online interventions can be effectively implemented, their efficacy needs to be evaluated. Nurses should be aware of the potential relationship between time online and depression in cancer patients. Early assessment and treatment of depressive symptoms in cancer patients is essential.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression in Face-to-Face and Internet Cancer Support Groups: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKlemm, Paulaen_US
dc.author.detailsPaula Klemm, DNS/DNSc/DSN, Associate Professor, University of Delaware, College of Health & Nursing Science, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: klemmpa@udel.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165632-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this pilot study was to examine depression in Internet and traditional (face-to-face) cancer support groups. Bandura's' Social Cognitive Theory formed the framework for this work. Subjects were recruited from traditional and Internet cancer support groups over a one-month period. The sample consisted of 40 cancer patients, 14 from traditional groups and 26 from an Internet cancer support group with different cancer diagnoses. The face-to-face group was 100% male and the online group was 56 percent male (n = 14) and 44 percent female (n = 12). Data collection instruments consisted of a researcher developed demographic survey and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The cutoff score for the diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder on the CES-D is 16. Findings revealed that the groups differed significantly on level of depression. The traditional (face-to-face) group had a mean score of 1.86 (SD = 2.69) on the CES-D and the online group had a mean score of 29.27 (SD = 11.89); p = 0.00). Ninety-two percent of the online group had CES-D scores that indicated depression, as compared to zero percent for the face-to-face groups. When CES-D scores were correlated to total time on the Internet, results indicated that depression rates decreased over time (p = 0.06). This study provided provocative data suggesting that more depressed patients with cancer use Internet support groups as compared to face-to-face support. Results may be explained by variance between the types of cancer, gender, or the self-selection of subjects participating in both groups. These factors limit applicability findings, as does the small sample size and lack of female participation in the face-to-face groups. Before online interventions can be effectively implemented, their efficacy needs to be evaluated. Nurses should be aware of the potential relationship between time online and depression in cancer patients. Early assessment and treatment of depressive symptoms in cancer patients is essential.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:10Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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