2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165633
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurturing Families: A BMT Bereavement Program
Author(s):
Brovitz-Palmer, Sallie
Author Details:
Sallie Brovitz-Palmer, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
Abstract:
Blood and marrow transplant (BMT) nursing is focused on the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of patients and their family members and significant others (FMSOs). Unfortunately, some patients do not survive. As the final step in a long journey, the patient's death may be the most challenging circumstance that FMSOs endure. Nurses must therefore include caring for the survivors in their continuum of care. One way to assist bereaved individuals is through a bereavement follow-up program. This allows the already established nurse-survivor relationship to continue to a point of closure and provides time for grieving and sharing of feelings. Our BMT bereavement program was developed over 10 years ago as a research utilization project. A committee using a structured one-year plan manages it. A committee member prepares a contact file and sends a sympathy card within the first two weeks following the patient's death. The committee member contacts the patient's primary nurse to ascertain his/her interest in completing follow-up phone calls. To ensure consistency, the nurse who makes the call follows a list of specific questions. At two-months, we mail an informational packet containing a list of resource materials, information on grieving, and an explanatory cover letter. During the six-month phone call, physician contact information is given to FMSOs who are interested in discussing autopsy results. At this time termination is mentioned, allowing preparation time for FMSOs and the nurse. The 12-month follow-up call uses an informal script to assist the nurse in reaching closure with FMSOs. Ongoing contact is not offered. If FMSOs express the need for continued contact, they are referred to our institution's cancer counseling center. We also mail a separate holiday packet to FMSOs prior to the first Thanksgiving after the patient's death. It gives coping suggestions, addresses many cultural and religious issues, and is accompanied by a letter explaining its purpose. Bereavement follow-up of BMT FMSOs is a critical aspect of our total care. During BMT, patients and FMSOs depend upon nursing staff for information as well as emotional support. Our structured bereavement program provides a mechanism to shift care to the survivors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurturing Families: A BMT Bereavement Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrovitz-Palmer, Sallieen_US
dc.author.detailsSallie Brovitz-Palmer, Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165633-
dc.description.abstractBlood and marrow transplant (BMT) nursing is focused on the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of patients and their family members and significant others (FMSOs). Unfortunately, some patients do not survive. As the final step in a long journey, the patient's death may be the most challenging circumstance that FMSOs endure. Nurses must therefore include caring for the survivors in their continuum of care. One way to assist bereaved individuals is through a bereavement follow-up program. This allows the already established nurse-survivor relationship to continue to a point of closure and provides time for grieving and sharing of feelings. Our BMT bereavement program was developed over 10 years ago as a research utilization project. A committee using a structured one-year plan manages it. A committee member prepares a contact file and sends a sympathy card within the first two weeks following the patient's death. The committee member contacts the patient's primary nurse to ascertain his/her interest in completing follow-up phone calls. To ensure consistency, the nurse who makes the call follows a list of specific questions. At two-months, we mail an informational packet containing a list of resource materials, information on grieving, and an explanatory cover letter. During the six-month phone call, physician contact information is given to FMSOs who are interested in discussing autopsy results. At this time termination is mentioned, allowing preparation time for FMSOs and the nurse. The 12-month follow-up call uses an informal script to assist the nurse in reaching closure with FMSOs. Ongoing contact is not offered. If FMSOs express the need for continued contact, they are referred to our institution's cancer counseling center. We also mail a separate holiday packet to FMSOs prior to the first Thanksgiving after the patient's death. It gives coping suggestions, addresses many cultural and religious issues, and is accompanied by a letter explaining its purpose. Bereavement follow-up of BMT FMSOs is a critical aspect of our total care. During BMT, patients and FMSOs depend upon nursing staff for information as well as emotional support. Our structured bereavement program provides a mechanism to shift care to the survivors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:11Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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