2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165635
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What About My Children?
Author(s):
Ropka, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Ropka, University of Virginia, School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: m.ropka@virginia.edu
Abstract:
Problem: Scientific progress has increased the ability to estimate hereditary breast cancer (HBC) risk. This presents concerns about communicating HBC risk information, especially with children. Purpose: Among women with early-onset breast cancer (BrCa), examine: 1) concerns regarding children's BrCa risk, 2) perceptions of children's BRCA1 concerns, and 3) beliefs regarding whether, at what age, and how children should be informed about BRCA1 risk. Theoretical Framework: Levant Hal's Common-sense Model guided this study. Methods: Study sample was recruited from all 71 Virginia hospitals reporting (1994-1997) BRCA1 cases in women before age 50. Women were sent: 1) Family History Questionnaire (FHQ) to assess if criteria for suspected HBC were met, and 2) Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Questionnaire (KABQ) to collect information about demographics and BRCA1 risk concerns. FHQ and KABQ were developed based on literature review, a validated ELSI/NHGRI/NIH questionnaire, and experience of investigators, then pilot tested and revised. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics for KABQ items were calculated (SPSS 9.0). Results: Eighty seven percent (273/314) of study participants returned both questionnaires. Demographic characteristics reported by 267 participants included 91% Caucasian; 23% high school graduates, 27% college graduates, 18% graduate degrees; 6% never married; 72% with children. Fifty two percent met study criteria for suspected HBC. Of 231 women with children, 82% were concerned about their children's breast cancer risk "because of your diagnosis of breast cancer." Fifty five percent of women reported their children, both sons and daughters, were concerned about his/her own breast cancer risk "because of your diagnosis of breast cancer." Sixty one percent believed that children should "first be given information about their own risk for getting breast cancer" before age 18. Women who thought children should be given BRCA1 risk information reported it should be provided by any of the following: a parent (84%), primary care provider (65%), gynecologist (33%), oncologist (19%), nurse or nurse practitioner (17.5%), genetic counselor (12%), or friends (4%). Implications: Future cancer nursing practice, research, education, and policy should address potential BRCA1 risk in children. Our study suggests the need for HBC informational resources for children and families, and can guide their development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat About My Children?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRopka, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Ropka, University of Virginia, School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: m.ropka@virginia.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165635-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Scientific progress has increased the ability to estimate hereditary breast cancer (HBC) risk. This presents concerns about communicating HBC risk information, especially with children. Purpose: Among women with early-onset breast cancer (BrCa), examine: 1) concerns regarding children's BrCa risk, 2) perceptions of children's BRCA1 concerns, and 3) beliefs regarding whether, at what age, and how children should be informed about BRCA1 risk. Theoretical Framework: Levant Hal's Common-sense Model guided this study. Methods: Study sample was recruited from all 71 Virginia hospitals reporting (1994-1997) BRCA1 cases in women before age 50. Women were sent: 1) Family History Questionnaire (FHQ) to assess if criteria for suspected HBC were met, and 2) Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Questionnaire (KABQ) to collect information about demographics and BRCA1 risk concerns. FHQ and KABQ were developed based on literature review, a validated ELSI/NHGRI/NIH questionnaire, and experience of investigators, then pilot tested and revised. Data Analysis: Descriptive statistics for KABQ items were calculated (SPSS 9.0). Results: Eighty seven percent (273/314) of study participants returned both questionnaires. Demographic characteristics reported by 267 participants included 91% Caucasian; 23% high school graduates, 27% college graduates, 18% graduate degrees; 6% never married; 72% with children. Fifty two percent met study criteria for suspected HBC. Of 231 women with children, 82% were concerned about their children's breast cancer risk "because of your diagnosis of breast cancer." Fifty five percent of women reported their children, both sons and daughters, were concerned about his/her own breast cancer risk "because of your diagnosis of breast cancer." Sixty one percent believed that children should "first be given information about their own risk for getting breast cancer" before age 18. Women who thought children should be given BRCA1 risk information reported it should be provided by any of the following: a parent (84%), primary care provider (65%), gynecologist (33%), oncologist (19%), nurse or nurse practitioner (17.5%), genetic counselor (12%), or friends (4%). Implications: Future cancer nursing practice, research, education, and policy should address potential BRCA1 risk in children. Our study suggests the need for HBC informational resources for children and families, and can guide their development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:13Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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