Lymphedema, Pain, and Quality of Life in Axillary Lymph Node Dissection and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Breast Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165637
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lymphedema, Pain, and Quality of Life in Axillary Lymph Node Dissection and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Breast Cancer Patients
Author(s):
White, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth White, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Staff Nurse, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USA
Abstract:
Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is performed in women with breast cancer to predict survival, to stage disease, and to reduce the risk of regional recurrence. Complications associated with ALND include lymphedema, pain, and reduced range of motion. These complications may impact quality of life. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), an alternative to ALND, involves the removal of the first lymph node drained by the invasive tumor, theoretically reducing the complications associated with ALND. The aim of this study is to compare the complications experienced by patients receiving ALND and SLNB. Forty-six subjects with stage I and II tumors without axillary node disease (based on clinical assessment) were approached prior to surgery. Of the 44 subjects who agreed to participate, three subjects were excluded post operatively based on final pathology (change in stage of disease). Eleven subjects (12 cases) underwent an ALND and 32 subjects (32 cases) underwent SLND. Subjects were evaluated preoperatively, at six months, and at 12 months for change in arm circumference, range of motion (goniometer readings), pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), and quality of life (CARES-SF). Six-month evaluation has been completed on all but one subject. Twelve-month evaluations will be completed on all subjects in February 2002. Thirty-six of the subjects (88%) were Caucasian, 20 subjects (49%) had at least some college education, ages ranged from 29 to 83 years (average 61.4 years). The number of nodes in SLNBs ranged from one to four nodes (average 1.88), while the number of nodes in ALNDs ranged from seven to 17 nodes (average 11 nodes). A higher proportion of subjects with ALND showed notable arm swelling and decreased range of motion measurements on three out of four measures than SLND subjects. Sample size precluded statistically significant differences. Pre-operatively, pain scores were low and remained low at the six-month evaluation for women with SLNB. While reporting low pain scores, SLND subjects did use numerous descriptive terms suggesting a change in sensation not identified as "pain." Quality-of-life scores and ALND pain scores will be evaluated at the end of the study for differences between surgical groups at the three time intervals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLymphedema, Pain, and Quality of Life in Axillary Lymph Node Dissection and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy Breast Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth White, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, Staff Nurse, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165637-
dc.description.abstractAxillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is performed in women with breast cancer to predict survival, to stage disease, and to reduce the risk of regional recurrence. Complications associated with ALND include lymphedema, pain, and reduced range of motion. These complications may impact quality of life. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), an alternative to ALND, involves the removal of the first lymph node drained by the invasive tumor, theoretically reducing the complications associated with ALND. The aim of this study is to compare the complications experienced by patients receiving ALND and SLNB. Forty-six subjects with stage I and II tumors without axillary node disease (based on clinical assessment) were approached prior to surgery. Of the 44 subjects who agreed to participate, three subjects were excluded post operatively based on final pathology (change in stage of disease). Eleven subjects (12 cases) underwent an ALND and 32 subjects (32 cases) underwent SLND. Subjects were evaluated preoperatively, at six months, and at 12 months for change in arm circumference, range of motion (goniometer readings), pain (McGill Pain Questionnaire), and quality of life (CARES-SF). Six-month evaluation has been completed on all but one subject. Twelve-month evaluations will be completed on all subjects in February 2002. Thirty-six of the subjects (88%) were Caucasian, 20 subjects (49%) had at least some college education, ages ranged from 29 to 83 years (average 61.4 years). The number of nodes in SLNBs ranged from one to four nodes (average 1.88), while the number of nodes in ALNDs ranged from seven to 17 nodes (average 11 nodes). A higher proportion of subjects with ALND showed notable arm swelling and decreased range of motion measurements on three out of four measures than SLND subjects. Sample size precluded statistically significant differences. Pre-operatively, pain scores were low and remained low at the six-month evaluation for women with SLNB. While reporting low pain scores, SLND subjects did use numerous descriptive terms suggesting a change in sensation not identified as "pain." Quality-of-life scores and ALND pain scores will be evaluated at the end of the study for differences between surgical groups at the three time intervals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:16Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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