Enhancing Adaptation Following Radiation Treatment: Concrete Information Versus Emotional Expression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165641
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Adaptation Following Radiation Treatment: Concrete Information Versus Emotional Expression
Author(s):
Nail, Lillian; Grant, M.; Dean, G.; Mori, M.; Ellington, L.; Walker, B.
Author Details:
Lillian Nail, PhD, Professor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: naill@ohsu.edu; M. Grant; G. Dean; M. Mori; L. Ellington; B. Walker
Abstract:
The completion of RT is stressful because of fears about recurrence, feeling “unsafe,” and concern about symptom meaning. This three group RCT was a test of two theory-based approaches to enhancing adaptation: concrete objective information (COI), written expression of emotions (EE), and an attention control arm. COI was based on Johnson’s self-regulation theory and EE intervention was drawn from Pennebaker’s work on using writing to integrate traumatic experiences and promote adaptation. Women completing RT for breast cancer (N=262) provided written consent and completed baseline measures during the last two weeks of treatment. Following random assignment, the COI group listened to a tape-recorded message describing typical experiences (i.e. changes in side effects) experienced by women completing RT for breast cancer. The EE group was instructed to write about their cancer experience 30 minutes/day for 3 days. The control group listened to a brief tape-recorded message about community resources. All study variables were measured using instruments with established reliability and included: disruption in activities (SIP); mood (state PANAS); trait negative affectivity (trait PANAS); cancer-specific distress (IES); and side effect severity (SEC). The sample was middle-aged (M=55 years), white (82%), and married (66%). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test theory-driven hypotheses about intervention effects on disruption in function, negative mood, and cancer-specific distress controlling for trait negative affectivity and side effect severity. There were no significant group by time interactions indicating that all groups had similar scores on the dependent variables. Additional analyses revealed 20% nonadherence in the EE group with wide variation in the amount of writing among those who adhered. Unsolicited written comments indicated high levels of enthusiasm for EE in some participants. The pattern of self-report of level of disclosure in the six months following intervention suggests that EE nonadherence may reflect differences in timing of readiness for disclosure. This new finding has significant clinical implications for structuring the use of this increasingly popular intervention to accommodate preferences in participation and timing. Additional issues related to intervention design and the relevance and performance of specific outcome measures in survivorship research are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing Adaptation Following Radiation Treatment: Concrete Information Versus Emotional Expressionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNail, Lillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDean, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMori, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEllington, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, B.en_US
dc.author.detailsLillian Nail, PhD, Professor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: naill@ohsu.edu; M. Grant; G. Dean; M. Mori; L. Ellington; B. Walkeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165641-
dc.description.abstractThe completion of RT is stressful because of fears about recurrence, feeling “unsafe,” and concern about symptom meaning. This three group RCT was a test of two theory-based approaches to enhancing adaptation: concrete objective information (COI), written expression of emotions (EE), and an attention control arm. COI was based on Johnson’s self-regulation theory and EE intervention was drawn from Pennebaker’s work on using writing to integrate traumatic experiences and promote adaptation. Women completing RT for breast cancer (N=262) provided written consent and completed baseline measures during the last two weeks of treatment. Following random assignment, the COI group listened to a tape-recorded message describing typical experiences (i.e. changes in side effects) experienced by women completing RT for breast cancer. The EE group was instructed to write about their cancer experience 30 minutes/day for 3 days. The control group listened to a brief tape-recorded message about community resources. All study variables were measured using instruments with established reliability and included: disruption in activities (SIP); mood (state PANAS); trait negative affectivity (trait PANAS); cancer-specific distress (IES); and side effect severity (SEC). The sample was middle-aged (M=55 years), white (82%), and married (66%). Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test theory-driven hypotheses about intervention effects on disruption in function, negative mood, and cancer-specific distress controlling for trait negative affectivity and side effect severity. There were no significant group by time interactions indicating that all groups had similar scores on the dependent variables. Additional analyses revealed 20% nonadherence in the EE group with wide variation in the amount of writing among those who adhered. Unsolicited written comments indicated high levels of enthusiasm for EE in some participants. The pattern of self-report of level of disclosure in the six months following intervention suggests that EE nonadherence may reflect differences in timing of readiness for disclosure. This new finding has significant clinical implications for structuring the use of this increasingly popular intervention to accommodate preferences in participation and timing. Additional issues related to intervention design and the relevance and performance of specific outcome measures in survivorship research are discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:20Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.