Fatigue's Timing and Associated Risk Factors in Women Survivors Who Received Autologous Transplants for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165649
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue's Timing and Associated Risk Factors in Women Survivors Who Received Autologous Transplants for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Piper, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Piper, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing Adult Health & Fitness, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: barbarapiper@msn.com
Abstract:
Despite the fact that fatigue has been documented in quality of life studies as a major problem in transplant patients, few studies have determined the prevalence of fatigue, its timing in relationship to key phases of the transplant experience, and risk factors in women transplanted for breast cancer. As more women with breast cancer may be treated with high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by rescue autologous bone marrow (ABMT) or peripheral stem cell transplants (APSCT) on clinical trials and survive, it is imperative to document this information to determine the timing of fatigue interventions for those women at high risk. The primary study aims were to identify the incidence and current fatigue intensity levels in these women: identify how specific variables such as age, stage of disease, time since transplant, number of symptoms, and insomnia are associated with and predict fatigue intensity levels; and compare current fatigue intensity levels with recalled intensity levels 3 months prior to diagnosis, at the end of the initial CT regimen, Day –4 of HDCT prior to transplant, Days +2, +15, +100 post-transplant, and 6 7 12 months later. Components of the Integrated Fatigue Model© guided this study. Eighty women transplanted at a large Midwestern Medical Center who were still alive and free of disease (76% return rate) participated in this cross-sectional, descriptive mailed survey. Instruments included the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), an investigator-developed Recalled Fatigue Intensity Scale (RFIS), the adapted Given & Given Symptom Inventory, and the Morin Sleep Diary. All instruments have adequate reliability and validity estimates. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Preliminary data analyses reveals that the average respondent was a 48-year old college educated, married Caucasian female with stage II disease, who worked full time and had children living at home at the time of her APSCT three years prior to completing the survey. Mean recalled fatigue scores were highest on Day +2 post transplant (7.45 {SD=2.32}); the mean current fatigue level was 4.13 (SD=2.79) (PFS sensory subscale). Age, stage of disease, type and time since transplant were not significantly related to current or recalled fatigue intensity levels. Significant but weak inverse relationships were found between children currently living at home and recalled fatigue levels at the end of initial CT (r=-.29, p<.05) and current fatigue sensory scores (r=-.23, p<.05). Study findings will assist clinicians in monitoring fatigue during key phases of the transplant experience and enable investigators to predict women at high risk for fatigue and to better time interventions to treat fatigue in these women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue's Timing and Associated Risk Factors in Women Survivors Who Received Autologous Transplants for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Piper, University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing Adult Health & Fitness, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: barbarapiper@msn.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165649-
dc.description.abstractDespite the fact that fatigue has been documented in quality of life studies as a major problem in transplant patients, few studies have determined the prevalence of fatigue, its timing in relationship to key phases of the transplant experience, and risk factors in women transplanted for breast cancer. As more women with breast cancer may be treated with high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by rescue autologous bone marrow (ABMT) or peripheral stem cell transplants (APSCT) on clinical trials and survive, it is imperative to document this information to determine the timing of fatigue interventions for those women at high risk. The primary study aims were to identify the incidence and current fatigue intensity levels in these women: identify how specific variables such as age, stage of disease, time since transplant, number of symptoms, and insomnia are associated with and predict fatigue intensity levels; and compare current fatigue intensity levels with recalled intensity levels 3 months prior to diagnosis, at the end of the initial CT regimen, Day &ndash;4 of HDCT prior to transplant, Days +2, +15, +100 post-transplant, and 6 7 12 months later. Components of the Integrated Fatigue Model&copy; guided this study. Eighty women transplanted at a large Midwestern Medical Center who were still alive and free of disease (76% return rate) participated in this cross-sectional, descriptive mailed survey. Instruments included the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS), an investigator-developed Recalled Fatigue Intensity Scale (RFIS), the adapted Given &amp; Given Symptom Inventory, and the Morin Sleep Diary. All instruments have adequate reliability and validity estimates. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Preliminary data analyses reveals that the average respondent was a 48-year old college educated, married Caucasian female with stage II disease, who worked full time and had children living at home at the time of her APSCT three years prior to completing the survey. Mean recalled fatigue scores were highest on Day +2 post transplant (7.45 {SD=2.32}); the mean current fatigue level was 4.13 (SD=2.79) (PFS sensory subscale). Age, stage of disease, type and time since transplant were not significantly related to current or recalled fatigue intensity levels. Significant but weak inverse relationships were found between children currently living at home and recalled fatigue levels at the end of initial CT (r=-.29, p&lt;.05) and current fatigue sensory scores (r=-.23, p&lt;.05). Study findings will assist clinicians in monitoring fatigue during key phases of the transplant experience and enable investigators to predict women at high risk for fatigue and to better time interventions to treat fatigue in these women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:28Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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