Examining Psychological Factors in Relationship to Symptoms and Fatigue in Women Receiving Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165650
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Psychological Factors in Relationship to Symptoms and Fatigue in Women Receiving Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Higginbotham, P.
Author Details:
P. Higginbotham, Wings of Hope, Council Bluffs, Iowa, USA
Abstract:
Significance: Depressed mood, anxiety and fatigue are common occurring symptoms in women receiving adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy (ABCC). having a clear understanding of the relationship of these symptoms and the role they play in symptom management is crucial in providing effective psychosocial care for these women and their families. Problem and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine patterns and relationships of symptoms, anxiety and depression on fatigue in women receiving ABCC. Scientific Framework: Components of Piper’s Integrated Fatigue Model were selected for this study. Methods: A prospective, repeated measures design was used for this study. The sample included 25 Caucasian women with no unstable co-morbidities, ages 40 – 65 (X = 54.3), most were married, employed, and had some post-secondary education. Women were receiving Adriamycin-based chemotherapy after surgery for Stage I or II disease. Instruments used were a Demographic Data sheet, Symptom Experience Scale (SES) completed 2 days prior and 7 days after each treatment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) completed 2 days prior to cycle 1, and 7 days after cycle 4, and Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) completed 48 hours after each treatment; all with established reliability and validity. Subjects were enrolled prior to or during the week after the first chemotherapy treatment. Data Analysis: Data entered into Epi-Info and transferred to SPSS data management and analysis programs. Findings: Anxiety Scores at cycle 1 were X = 6.92 (1.0-18.0), SD 4.93 and at cycle 4, X = 6.64 (1.0-13.0), SD = 3.76. Depression scores at cycle 1 were X = 3.8 (1.0 – 14.0), SD = 3.54 and at cycle 4, X = 6.96 (0 – 13.0), SD = 3.32. SES scores at cycle 1 (after treatment) were X = 1.31, (.44 – 2.22), SD = .49 and at cycle 4 (after treatment), X = 1.15 (.33 – 2.50), SD = .45. PFS scores at cycle 1 were X = 5.99 (1.45 – 9.18), SD = 1.98 and at cycle 4, X = 5.70 (3.32 – 8.95), SD = 1.48. Paired t-test results indicate a significant increase in depression scores occurring between cycle 1 and cycle 4 (t=-.380, p=.001). Significant correlations were found between anxiety and depression during cycle 1, r = .723, (p<.001). Anxiety at cycle 1 was also correlated with symptoms (SES) both before (r = .657) and after treatment (r = .571, p<.003). Anxiety at cycle 4 correlated only with symptoms (SES) after treatment (r = .469, p<.03). Depression at cycle 1 correlated with symptoms (SES) both before (r = .855, p<.001), and after treatment (r = .683, p <.001). Depression correlated with fatigue (PFS) only at cycle 4 (r = .618, p<.002). In summary, anxiety remained consistent but depression increased throughout the chemotherapy period. Both psychological factors were associated with increased symptoms. Implications: Screening for anxiety and depression prior to initiation and periodically throughout chemotherapy would assist in identifying high risk patients. Since these patients report greater symptom distress, recognizing and treating the anxiety and depression may decrease the intensity of symptoms, including fatigue. A tip sheet with interventions for anxiety and depression or referrals to psychiatric services may be appropriate ways to accomplish this.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Psychological Factors in Relationship to Symptoms and Fatigue in Women Receiving Adjuvant Breast Cancer Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHigginbotham, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsP. Higginbotham, Wings of Hope, Council Bluffs, Iowa, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165650-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Depressed mood, anxiety and fatigue are common occurring symptoms in women receiving adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy (ABCC). having a clear understanding of the relationship of these symptoms and the role they play in symptom management is crucial in providing effective psychosocial care for these women and their families. Problem and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine patterns and relationships of symptoms, anxiety and depression on fatigue in women receiving ABCC. Scientific Framework: Components of Piper&rsquo;s Integrated Fatigue Model were selected for this study. Methods: A prospective, repeated measures design was used for this study. The sample included 25 Caucasian women with no unstable co-morbidities, ages 40 &ndash; 65 (X = 54.3), most were married, employed, and had some post-secondary education. Women were receiving Adriamycin-based chemotherapy after surgery for Stage I or II disease. Instruments used were a Demographic Data sheet, Symptom Experience Scale (SES) completed 2 days prior and 7 days after each treatment, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) completed 2 days prior to cycle 1, and 7 days after cycle 4, and Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) completed 48 hours after each treatment; all with established reliability and validity. Subjects were enrolled prior to or during the week after the first chemotherapy treatment. Data Analysis: Data entered into Epi-Info and transferred to SPSS data management and analysis programs. Findings: Anxiety Scores at cycle 1 were X = 6.92 (1.0-18.0), SD 4.93 and at cycle 4, X = 6.64 (1.0-13.0), SD = 3.76. Depression scores at cycle 1 were X = 3.8 (1.0 &ndash; 14.0), SD = 3.54 and at cycle 4, X = 6.96 (0 &ndash; 13.0), SD = 3.32. SES scores at cycle 1 (after treatment) were X = 1.31, (.44 &ndash; 2.22), SD = .49 and at cycle 4 (after treatment), X = 1.15 (.33 &ndash; 2.50), SD = .45. PFS scores at cycle 1 were X = 5.99 (1.45 &ndash; 9.18), SD = 1.98 and at cycle 4, X = 5.70 (3.32 &ndash; 8.95), SD = 1.48. Paired t-test results indicate a significant increase in depression scores occurring between cycle 1 and cycle 4 (t=-.380, p=.001). Significant correlations were found between anxiety and depression during cycle 1, r = .723, (p&lt;.001). Anxiety at cycle 1 was also correlated with symptoms (SES) both before (r = .657) and after treatment (r = .571, p&lt;.003). Anxiety at cycle 4 correlated only with symptoms (SES) after treatment (r = .469, p&lt;.03). Depression at cycle 1 correlated with symptoms (SES) both before (r = .855, p&lt;.001), and after treatment (r = .683, p &lt;.001). Depression correlated with fatigue (PFS) only at cycle 4 (r = .618, p&lt;.002). In summary, anxiety remained consistent but depression increased throughout the chemotherapy period. Both psychological factors were associated with increased symptoms. Implications: Screening for anxiety and depression prior to initiation and periodically throughout chemotherapy would assist in identifying high risk patients. Since these patients report greater symptom distress, recognizing and treating the anxiety and depression may decrease the intensity of symptoms, including fatigue. A tip sheet with interventions for anxiety and depression or referrals to psychiatric services may be appropriate ways to accomplish this.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:29Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.