Treatment-Related Menopause In Female Cancer Survivors: Prevalence And Quality Of Life Issues

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165653
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Treatment-Related Menopause In Female Cancer Survivors: Prevalence And Quality Of Life Issues
Author(s):
Bauer, S.
Author Details:
S. Bauer, University of Massachusetts Center for Women�s Health, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Abstract:
Significance: Nearly 200,000 women under the age of 50 will be diagnosed with cancer (ca) in the U.S. this year. The majority of these women will receive aggressive cancer treatment (tx) and are estimated to be alive in ten years. Problem: As women with ca are surviving longer, long-term consequences of ca and its tx are increasingly important. Premature menopause is evident in oncology practice and is recognized as a potential tx side effect. However, prevalence with regard to various types of ca and tx, and quality of life (QOL) issues have been minimally explored. Purposes: 1) To document the prevalence of premature menopause in a broad sample of female ca patients, examining the effects of age, ca diagnosis (dx), & type of tx; and 2) To evaluate psychological adjustment and QOL factors. Theoretical framework: QOL and cancer survivorship by Ferrell et al. (1995). Methods: Cohort sample (N=1,078) meeting the registry of an academic health care facility in central New England: ca dx between 1985-1995; 18-50 years of age at dx; alive at study commencement. Comprehensive telephone questionnaire designed for this study, a health-related QOL assessment, and the Brief Profile of Mood States: reliability and validity were established on all instruments. Data were collected on 374 subjects: 35% response rate. Data analysis: Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistics were conducted using Epi Info and SAS Windows 6.12. Findings: 77% became menopausal due to ca tx. Half lost their menses during chemotherapy, of which 78% never returned. Age was a significant predictor of treatment-related menopause (p=.001). Breast and GYN ca, as well as chemotherapy and GYN surgery, were also significant predictors. 36% did not become pregnant after ca because they either couldn’t or were medically advised against it; of which one-fifth were quite distressed that they couldn’t have children. 5% had given birth since dx. 71% have been bothered by symptoms of menopause, with sexual difficulties, mood disturbances, and hot flashes as the most disturbing. Implications: Oncologic treatments result in premature menopause and infertility, which can have profound long-term consequences for the increasing number of female cancer survivors. Oncology nurses are well suited to assess and intervene with this important cancer survivorship issue.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTreatment-Related Menopause In Female Cancer Survivors: Prevalence And Quality Of Life Issuesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBauer, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsS. Bauer, University of Massachusetts Center for Women�s Health, Worcester, Massachusetts, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165653-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Nearly 200,000 women under the age of 50 will be diagnosed with cancer (ca) in the U.S. this year. The majority of these women will receive aggressive cancer treatment (tx) and are estimated to be alive in ten years. Problem: As women with ca are surviving longer, long-term consequences of ca and its tx are increasingly important. Premature menopause is evident in oncology practice and is recognized as a potential tx side effect. However, prevalence with regard to various types of ca and tx, and quality of life (QOL) issues have been minimally explored. Purposes: 1) To document the prevalence of premature menopause in a broad sample of female ca patients, examining the effects of age, ca diagnosis (dx), & type of tx; and 2) To evaluate psychological adjustment and QOL factors. Theoretical framework: QOL and cancer survivorship by Ferrell et al. (1995). Methods: Cohort sample (N=1,078) meeting the registry of an academic health care facility in central New England: ca dx between 1985-1995; 18-50 years of age at dx; alive at study commencement. Comprehensive telephone questionnaire designed for this study, a health-related QOL assessment, and the Brief Profile of Mood States: reliability and validity were established on all instruments. Data were collected on 374 subjects: 35% response rate. Data analysis: Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate statistics were conducted using Epi Info and SAS Windows 6.12. Findings: 77% became menopausal due to ca tx. Half lost their menses during chemotherapy, of which 78% never returned. Age was a significant predictor of treatment-related menopause (p=.001). Breast and GYN ca, as well as chemotherapy and GYN surgery, were also significant predictors. 36% did not become pregnant after ca because they either couldn’t or were medically advised against it; of which one-fifth were quite distressed that they couldn’t have children. 5% had given birth since dx. 71% have been bothered by symptoms of menopause, with sexual difficulties, mood disturbances, and hot flashes as the most disturbing. Implications: Oncologic treatments result in premature menopause and infertility, which can have profound long-term consequences for the increasing number of female cancer survivors. Oncology nurses are well suited to assess and intervene with this important cancer survivorship issue.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:32Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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