Genetic Testing For Breast Cancer Risk: Women's Perceptions And Information Needs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165655
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Genetic Testing For Breast Cancer Risk: Women's Perceptions And Information Needs
Author(s):
Bottorff, Joan
Author Details:
Joan Bottorff, PhD, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Abstract:
Many women perceive themselves to be at high risk to develop breast cancer. As a result media reports of genetic discoveries (e.g., the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes) have heightened interest in genetic testing and led to some unrealistic expectations about the kind of information genetic testing can provide. For example, some women believe that a simple blood test can provide them with a definite answer about whether or not they will develop breast cancer. Increased demand for genetic testing from those at high risk for hereditary breast cancer as well as those who are not has already resulted in long waiting lists in some Canadian centers. More information about women who are interested in genetic testing for breast cancer risk is important so that appropriate education and counseling strategies can be developed. We conducted a telephone survey of women with and without breast cancer in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The sample included 761 women who had not been diagnosed with breast cancer representing three age groups (20-39 yrs, 40-59 yrs, and 60-79 years) randomly generated and drawn proportionately from all regions of British Columbia using the Canada Survey Sampler, software that provides access to both “listed” and “unlisted” telephone numbers of households. A second sample of 235 women diagnosed with breast cancer were also surveyed. This sample, also stratified on the basis of age, was randomly generated from the provincial cancer registry. Data were collected by trained personnel using a Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing system. The survey included questions to assess understanding of breast cancer risk, interest in genetic testing, reasons for wanting testing, and factors associated with level of understanding and interest. Findings will be presented describing the proportions of women who are interested in genetic testing for breast cancer risk and what women understand about the role and value of such testing. The extent to which interest in genetic testing for breast cancer risk is influenced by the provision of information about the accuracy of the test or the incidence of hereditary breast cancer will also be described for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and for those who have not been diagnosed. Finally, suggestions for the development of approaches to cancer risk communication that are responsive to women’s needs and support cost-effective uses of genetic testing services will be described.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGenetic Testing For Breast Cancer Risk: Women's Perceptions And Information Needsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBottorff, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsJoan Bottorff, PhD, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canadaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165655-
dc.description.abstractMany women perceive themselves to be at high risk to develop breast cancer. As a result media reports of genetic discoveries (e.g., the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes) have heightened interest in genetic testing and led to some unrealistic expectations about the kind of information genetic testing can provide. For example, some women believe that a simple blood test can provide them with a definite answer about whether or not they will develop breast cancer. Increased demand for genetic testing from those at high risk for hereditary breast cancer as well as those who are not has already resulted in long waiting lists in some Canadian centers. More information about women who are interested in genetic testing for breast cancer risk is important so that appropriate education and counseling strategies can be developed. We conducted a telephone survey of women with and without breast cancer in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The sample included 761 women who had not been diagnosed with breast cancer representing three age groups (20-39 yrs, 40-59 yrs, and 60-79 years) randomly generated and drawn proportionately from all regions of British Columbia using the Canada Survey Sampler, software that provides access to both “listed” and “unlisted” telephone numbers of households. A second sample of 235 women diagnosed with breast cancer were also surveyed. This sample, also stratified on the basis of age, was randomly generated from the provincial cancer registry. Data were collected by trained personnel using a Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing system. The survey included questions to assess understanding of breast cancer risk, interest in genetic testing, reasons for wanting testing, and factors associated with level of understanding and interest. Findings will be presented describing the proportions of women who are interested in genetic testing for breast cancer risk and what women understand about the role and value of such testing. The extent to which interest in genetic testing for breast cancer risk is influenced by the provision of information about the accuracy of the test or the incidence of hereditary breast cancer will also be described for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and for those who have not been diagnosed. Finally, suggestions for the development of approaches to cancer risk communication that are responsive to women’s needs and support cost-effective uses of genetic testing services will be described.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:34Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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