Exploring Women-Centered Care In Cervical Screening Programs For Women In Three Ethno-Cultural Communities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165656
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring Women-Centered Care In Cervical Screening Programs For Women In Three Ethno-Cultural Communities
Author(s):
Bottorff, Joan
Author Details:
Joan Bottorff, PhD, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Abstract:
High rates of cervical cancer among several ethnic groups in a Canadian urban setting and observations that women were not receiving cervical screening from their family physicians precipitated the development of three innovative programs to enhance women’s access to cancer screening in the Asian, South Asian and First Nations communities. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe critical elements of women-centered care within the context of cervical screening in these three ethno-cultural communities using a collective case study design. The primary source of data for each case study were open-ended interviews with purposeful samples of women from each of the target communities as well as key informants (e.g., family physicians, nurses, clinic staff). Following thematic analysis of each case study, cross-case analysis was facilitated by comparing and contrasting common issues and contextual factors influencing women’s experiences. Cervical screening services for each of the study groups were shaped by attention to ethno-cultural values, women’s desire for thorough explanations, and the importance of a comfortable setting. While the clinics provided safe and respectful services for women seeking cervical screening, the women expected much more. Women viewed the clinics as places where they could address health concerns with female health providers; an opportunity that was not readily available in their communities. Structural barriers prevented the clinics from meeting women’s needs beyond those directly related to cervical screening. Cross-case analysis revealed three key elements of women-centered care: respectful and culturally appropriate interactions between women and health providers, the importance of providing acceptable alternatives for women, and the need for comprehensive health services. While the establishment of Pap test clinics for ethno-cultural groups has enhanced participation in cervical screening, broader changes in health policy and the structure of health services are required for existing programs to fully implement the elements of women-centered health care identified in this study.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring Women-Centered Care In Cervical Screening Programs For Women In Three Ethno-Cultural Communitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBottorff, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsJoan Bottorff, PhD, Associate Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canadaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165656-
dc.description.abstractHigh rates of cervical cancer among several ethnic groups in a Canadian urban setting and observations that women were not receiving cervical screening from their family physicians precipitated the development of three innovative programs to enhance women’s access to cancer screening in the Asian, South Asian and First Nations communities. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe critical elements of women-centered care within the context of cervical screening in these three ethno-cultural communities using a collective case study design. The primary source of data for each case study were open-ended interviews with purposeful samples of women from each of the target communities as well as key informants (e.g., family physicians, nurses, clinic staff). Following thematic analysis of each case study, cross-case analysis was facilitated by comparing and contrasting common issues and contextual factors influencing women’s experiences. Cervical screening services for each of the study groups were shaped by attention to ethno-cultural values, women’s desire for thorough explanations, and the importance of a comfortable setting. While the clinics provided safe and respectful services for women seeking cervical screening, the women expected much more. Women viewed the clinics as places where they could address health concerns with female health providers; an opportunity that was not readily available in their communities. Structural barriers prevented the clinics from meeting women’s needs beyond those directly related to cervical screening. Cross-case analysis revealed three key elements of women-centered care: respectful and culturally appropriate interactions between women and health providers, the importance of providing acceptable alternatives for women, and the need for comprehensive health services. While the establishment of Pap test clinics for ethno-cultural groups has enhanced participation in cervical screening, broader changes in health policy and the structure of health services are required for existing programs to fully implement the elements of women-centered health care identified in this study.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:35Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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