Hot Flashes And Other Menopausal Symptoms In Breast Cancer Survivors And Age-Matched Healthy Comparison Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165657
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hot Flashes And Other Menopausal Symptoms In Breast Cancer Survivors And Age-Matched Healthy Comparison Women
Author(s):
Carpenter, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Significance: Hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms, such as vaginal dryness and dyspareunia, are significant problems for breast cancer survivors (BCS). Hormone replacement therapy is generally contraindicated for this population and other strategies for symptom relief are not well researched or widely used in clinical practice. Problem/Purpose: Prior research describing hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in BCS has not included comparison groups of healthy women (HW) and has not fully assessed the impact of these symptoms on quality of life (QOL), affect, or mood. Study purposes were to describe and compare the symptom experiences of hot flashes (frequency, severity, bother, impact on QOL, affect, mood) and menopausal symptoms (frequency, distress, impact on affect and mood) between BCS and age-matched, naturally pre-, peri- or postmenopausal HW without cancer. Theoretical Framework: This study was based on the UCSF Model of Symptom Management. A basic premise of this model is that detailed, multidimensional symptom assessment is key to effective symptom management. Methods: Participants included 71 BCS recruited through a cancer registry and 63 HW recruited via newspaper advertisements. BCS were a mean of 43 months post diagnosis and 41 months post treatment. All participants completed informed consent, a 2-day prospective hot flash diary, numeric rating scales of hot flash severity and bother, a hot flash related QOL scale, the Headley Menopausal Symptom Assessment Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the Profile of Mood States (alphas > .82). Data Analysis: Groups were not significantly different on age, race, employment status, education or body mass index, but significantly more BCS were married (p < .04). As expected, groups differed on menopausal status, with 79% of BCS being postmenopausal as compared to only 57% of age-matched HW. BCS reported significantly higher hot flash frequency on diary days 1 and 2, higher hot flash severity and bother, poorer hot flash related QOL, higher menopausal symptom frequency and distress (all p's < .01), and higher negative affect (p < .05) in comparison to HW. Profile of Mood State scores were not significantly different between groups, although mean scores for BCS were higher than HW on all subscales. These results did not change when a 2x2 ANOVA controlling for marital status was performed (group by marital status). Findings/Implications: Findings suggest (1) hot flashes other menopausal symptoms are much more frequent, severe, bothersome and disruptive to QOL and affect among BCS in comparison to naturally pre-, peri- or postmenopausal HW of the same age and (2) relief of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms may result in significant improvements in QOL and negative affect among BCS. Findings provide strong rationale for the need for future intervention research aimed at alleviating these symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHot Flashes And Other Menopausal Symptoms In Breast Cancer Survivors And Age-Matched Healthy Comparison Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165657-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms, such as vaginal dryness and dyspareunia, are significant problems for breast cancer survivors (BCS). Hormone replacement therapy is generally contraindicated for this population and other strategies for symptom relief are not well researched or widely used in clinical practice. Problem/Purpose: Prior research describing hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in BCS has not included comparison groups of healthy women (HW) and has not fully assessed the impact of these symptoms on quality of life (QOL), affect, or mood. Study purposes were to describe and compare the symptom experiences of hot flashes (frequency, severity, bother, impact on QOL, affect, mood) and menopausal symptoms (frequency, distress, impact on affect and mood) between BCS and age-matched, naturally pre-, peri- or postmenopausal HW without cancer. Theoretical Framework: This study was based on the UCSF Model of Symptom Management. A basic premise of this model is that detailed, multidimensional symptom assessment is key to effective symptom management. Methods: Participants included 71 BCS recruited through a cancer registry and 63 HW recruited via newspaper advertisements. BCS were a mean of 43 months post diagnosis and 41 months post treatment. All participants completed informed consent, a 2-day prospective hot flash diary, numeric rating scales of hot flash severity and bother, a hot flash related QOL scale, the Headley Menopausal Symptom Assessment Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the Profile of Mood States (alphas &gt; .82). Data Analysis: Groups were not significantly different on age, race, employment status, education or body mass index, but significantly more BCS were married (p &lt; .04). As expected, groups differed on menopausal status, with 79% of BCS being postmenopausal as compared to only 57% of age-matched HW. BCS reported significantly higher hot flash frequency on diary days 1 and 2, higher hot flash severity and bother, poorer hot flash related QOL, higher menopausal symptom frequency and distress (all p's &lt; .01), and higher negative affect (p &lt; .05) in comparison to HW. Profile of Mood State scores were not significantly different between groups, although mean scores for BCS were higher than HW on all subscales. These results did not change when a 2x2 ANOVA controlling for marital status was performed (group by marital status). Findings/Implications: Findings suggest (1) hot flashes other menopausal symptoms are much more frequent, severe, bothersome and disruptive to QOL and affect among BCS in comparison to naturally pre-, peri- or postmenopausal HW of the same age and (2) relief of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms may result in significant improvements in QOL and negative affect among BCS. Findings provide strong rationale for the need for future intervention research aimed at alleviating these symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:36Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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