The Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale: A Tool For Assessing The Impact Of Hot Flashes Following Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165658
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale: A Tool For Assessing The Impact Of Hot Flashes Following Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Carpenter, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Significance: Hot flashes are the most severe and fourth most prevalent menopausal symptom reported by breast cancer survivors (BCS). Hot flashes affect over 65% of this population, with 59% rating the symptom as severe and 44% reporting they are extremely distressed by the symptom. Problem: Despite the problematic nature of this symptom, limited data exist concerning the impact of hot flashes. Although hot flashes appear to interfere with various aspects of a woman's life, prior research suggests that standard quality of life (QOL) measures, such as the SF-12, may not be sensitive for capturing this impact. Purpose: The study purpose was examine psychometric properties of the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDI). This tool was designed to measure the impact of hot flashes on overall QOL (item 10) as well as on 9 specific activities (items 1-9: work, social activities, leisure activities, sleep, mood, concentration, relations with others, sexuality, enjoyment of life). Items were selected based on a review of literature and spontaneous discussions with symptomatic BCS. The HFRDI consists of a series of 0-10 point numeric rating scales and was modeled on Cleeland's Brief Pain Inventory and Jacobsen's Fatigue Symptom Inventory. Theoretical Framework: This study was based on the UCSF Model of Symptom Management which stresses the importance of thoroughly assessing a symptom and its associated outcomes. General principles of psychometric theory were also applied. Methods: Consenting participants included 71 BCS recruited through a cancer registry and 63 age-matched healthy women (HW) recruited via newspaper ads. BCS were a mean of 43 months post diagnosis and 41 months post treatment. At an initial time point and again 6 months later, all participants completed a 2-day prospective hot flash diary, numeric ratings scales of overall hot flash severity and bother, and the HFRDI. Data Analysis: At time 1, 62% of BCS versus 16% of HW reported daily hot flashes (p < .001). HFRDI items 1-9 were significantly correlated with ratings of hot flash severity (r's .41-.60, p's <.001), hot flash bother (r's .48-.67, p's <.001) and item 10 overall QOL (r's .45-.94, p's <.001). Inter-item correlations ranged from .43 to .87 (p's < .001) and Cronbach's alpha was .95. Similarly, at time 2, 55% of BCS versus 19% of HW reported daily hot flashes (p < .001). HFRDI items 1-9 were significantly correlated with ratings of hot flash severity (r's .36-.61, p's <.001), hot flash bother (r's .51-.70, p's <.001) and the QOL item (r's .63-.94, p's <.001). Inter-item correlations ranged from .47 to .85 (p's < .001) and Cronbach's alpha was .95. Findings/Implications: This tool appears psychometrically sound for measuring the impact of hot flashes on various daily activities and overall QOL. This tool may be useful to include in future hot flash research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale: A Tool For Assessing The Impact Of Hot Flashes Following Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Carpenter, PhD, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: janet.s.carpenter@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165658-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Hot flashes are the most severe and fourth most prevalent menopausal symptom reported by breast cancer survivors (BCS). Hot flashes affect over 65% of this population, with 59% rating the symptom as severe and 44% reporting they are extremely distressed by the symptom. Problem: Despite the problematic nature of this symptom, limited data exist concerning the impact of hot flashes. Although hot flashes appear to interfere with various aspects of a woman's life, prior research suggests that standard quality of life (QOL) measures, such as the SF-12, may not be sensitive for capturing this impact. Purpose: The study purpose was examine psychometric properties of the Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale (HFRDI). This tool was designed to measure the impact of hot flashes on overall QOL (item 10) as well as on 9 specific activities (items 1-9: work, social activities, leisure activities, sleep, mood, concentration, relations with others, sexuality, enjoyment of life). Items were selected based on a review of literature and spontaneous discussions with symptomatic BCS. The HFRDI consists of a series of 0-10 point numeric rating scales and was modeled on Cleeland's Brief Pain Inventory and Jacobsen's Fatigue Symptom Inventory. Theoretical Framework: This study was based on the UCSF Model of Symptom Management which stresses the importance of thoroughly assessing a symptom and its associated outcomes. General principles of psychometric theory were also applied. Methods: Consenting participants included 71 BCS recruited through a cancer registry and 63 age-matched healthy women (HW) recruited via newspaper ads. BCS were a mean of 43 months post diagnosis and 41 months post treatment. At an initial time point and again 6 months later, all participants completed a 2-day prospective hot flash diary, numeric ratings scales of overall hot flash severity and bother, and the HFRDI. Data Analysis: At time 1, 62% of BCS versus 16% of HW reported daily hot flashes (p &lt; .001). HFRDI items 1-9 were significantly correlated with ratings of hot flash severity (r's .41-.60, p's &lt;.001), hot flash bother (r's .48-.67, p's &lt;.001) and item 10 overall QOL (r's .45-.94, p's &lt;.001). Inter-item correlations ranged from .43 to .87 (p's &lt; .001) and Cronbach's alpha was .95. Similarly, at time 2, 55% of BCS versus 19% of HW reported daily hot flashes (p &lt; .001). HFRDI items 1-9 were significantly correlated with ratings of hot flash severity (r's .36-.61, p's &lt;.001), hot flash bother (r's .51-.70, p's &lt;.001) and the QOL item (r's .63-.94, p's &lt;.001). Inter-item correlations ranged from .47 to .85 (p's &lt; .001) and Cronbach's alpha was .95. Findings/Implications: This tool appears psychometrically sound for measuring the impact of hot flashes on various daily activities and overall QOL. This tool may be useful to include in future hot flash research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:37Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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