Symptom Prevalence, Distress, and Change Over Time In Adults Receiving Treatment For Lung Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165660
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom Prevalence, Distress, and Change Over Time In Adults Receiving Treatment For Lung Cancer
Author(s):
Cooley, M.
Author Details:
M. Cooley
Abstract:
Adequate management of symptoms in adults with cancer is an important focus for clinical intervention yet there is a dearth of research examining symptoms in this population. Knowledge of symptom prevalence, distress, and change over time can be used to develop empirically based interventions that can potentially minimize distressing symptoms and improve quality of life. The Roy Adaptation Model was the framework used to guide this study. The purposes of this study were to describe the prevalence of symptoms in adults receiving treatment (surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and combined therapy) for lung cancer, describe which symptoms are most distressing, identify how symptoms change over time, and identify patient related and clinical characteristics related to symptom distress. Data from three previous studies were used for this secondary analysis (n=117). Standardized interviews and a medical record review were used to collect information about patient related and clinical characteristics. The Symptom Distress Scale, a reliable and valid instrument, was used to measure the symptom distress from 11 different symptoms. Data analysis was conducted using SAS. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression were used for this analysis. Fatigue and pain were the two most distressing symptoms for each group and at each time. Many of the individual symptoms were associated with demographic covariates and treatment group values. For several symptoms, time 1 distress was a strong predictor of time 2 and time 3 symptom distress. The implications of the findings for symptom management will be addressed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom Prevalence, Distress, and Change Over Time In Adults Receiving Treatment For Lung Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooley, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Cooleyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165660-
dc.description.abstractAdequate management of symptoms in adults with cancer is an important focus for clinical intervention yet there is a dearth of research examining symptoms in this population. Knowledge of symptom prevalence, distress, and change over time can be used to develop empirically based interventions that can potentially minimize distressing symptoms and improve quality of life. The Roy Adaptation Model was the framework used to guide this study. The purposes of this study were to describe the prevalence of symptoms in adults receiving treatment (surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and combined therapy) for lung cancer, describe which symptoms are most distressing, identify how symptoms change over time, and identify patient related and clinical characteristics related to symptom distress. Data from three previous studies were used for this secondary analysis (n=117). Standardized interviews and a medical record review were used to collect information about patient related and clinical characteristics. The Symptom Distress Scale, a reliable and valid instrument, was used to measure the symptom distress from 11 different symptoms. Data analysis was conducted using SAS. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression were used for this analysis. Fatigue and pain were the two most distressing symptoms for each group and at each time. Many of the individual symptoms were associated with demographic covariates and treatment group values. For several symptoms, time 1 distress was a strong predictor of time 2 and time 3 symptom distress. The implications of the findings for symptom management will be addressed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:39Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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