2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165661
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Management of Spiritual Disequilibrium in Women With Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Coward, Doris
Author Details:
Doris Coward, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: dcoward@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Many persons experience spiritual disequilibrium when diagnosed with cancer. Several bodies of literature connect self-transcendence views and behaviors with finding positive meaning from an adverse situation such as cancer, resulting in a greater sense of well-being and change in life purpose. The study reported here is the qualitative arm of a study of self-transcendence promoting activities within a support group in 40 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Differences in self-transcendence experiences were explored among 5 women attending the oncology CNS facilitated 8 week support group and 5 comparison women not participating. Each woman was interviewed 3 times - at baseline, after the intervention (or 2-3 months later), and 1 year later. Women were asked to describe the effect of breast cancer on their lives and what helped them to feel better within the context of having cancer. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach to phenomenological analysis. Standard procedures to assure trustworthiness were implemented. Findings indicated a variety of changes in perspectives and behavior that helped women resolve spiritual disequilibrium associated with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Self-transcendence experiences that resulted in creating positive meanings varied over the 1year time period of the study. In this small sample, there were no clear differences in the described meaning-making experiences among women participating or not participating in the intervention support group. All women felt frightened and alone when confronted with their cancer diagnosis; all reached inwardly and outwardly for insight, information, and support; all described changes in perspective and behavior that helped them feel better during the year following diagnosis and treatment. Some changes in perspective led to modifications in life focus further described in the presentation. These findings and results from analysis of questionnaire data collected from the 10 participants and the 30 other women in the study do not support a hypothesis that activities implemented within the support group intervention significantly impact meaning-making or physical and emotional well-being. Study findings do support results from other studies of spiritual disequilibrium following a cancer diagnosis and lead to recommendations for oncology nurses who facilitate education and emotional support for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManagement of Spiritual Disequilibrium in Women With Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorCoward, Dorisen_US
dc.author.detailsDoris Coward, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Texas-Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: dcoward@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165661-
dc.description.abstractMany persons experience spiritual disequilibrium when diagnosed with cancer. Several bodies of literature connect self-transcendence views and behaviors with finding positive meaning from an adverse situation such as cancer, resulting in a greater sense of well-being and change in life purpose. The study reported here is the qualitative arm of a study of self-transcendence promoting activities within a support group in 40 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Differences in self-transcendence experiences were explored among 5 women attending the oncology CNS facilitated 8 week support group and 5 comparison women not participating. Each woman was interviewed 3 times - at baseline, after the intervention (or 2-3 months later), and 1 year later. Women were asked to describe the effect of breast cancer on their lives and what helped them to feel better within the context of having cancer. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Colaizzi's approach to phenomenological analysis. Standard procedures to assure trustworthiness were implemented. Findings indicated a variety of changes in perspectives and behavior that helped women resolve spiritual disequilibrium associated with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Self-transcendence experiences that resulted in creating positive meanings varied over the 1year time period of the study. In this small sample, there were no clear differences in the described meaning-making experiences among women participating or not participating in the intervention support group. All women felt frightened and alone when confronted with their cancer diagnosis; all reached inwardly and outwardly for insight, information, and support; all described changes in perspective and behavior that helped them feel better during the year following diagnosis and treatment. Some changes in perspective led to modifications in life focus further described in the presentation. These findings and results from analysis of questionnaire data collected from the 10 participants and the 30 other women in the study do not support a hypothesis that activities implemented within the support group intervention significantly impact meaning-making or physical and emotional well-being. Study findings do support results from other studies of spiritual disequilibrium following a cancer diagnosis and lead to recommendations for oncology nurses who facilitate education and emotional support for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:40Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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