2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165664
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Goals for Pain Relief: Scale Development and Pilot
Author(s):
Flannery, M.
Author Details:
M. Flannery
Abstract:
Despite research and educational efforts, unrelieved cancer pain remains a prevalent, clinically challenging problem. Although some progress has been made, much of the variance in pain outcomes remains unexplained. Goals are identified as a critical determinant of behavior in many psychological theories of behavior. Mid-range goals provide motivation, purpose, direction, and specificity for behavior. Therefore, patients' goals for pain relief is a useful construct that may explain variance in analgesic use and pain outcomes. Cancer patients' goals for pain severity and relief have been described previously, so the purpose of this study was to develop and pilot test Goals for Pain Relief, a summary item scale. Based on a review of the cancer pain literature, a 13-item scale was developed including goals for pain severity (2 items: pain worst, pain least), pain frequency, pain distress, pain relief, and desired level of interference on activities(7 items). An additional item queried how important pain relief was compared to other goals. The items were reviewed by four cancer pain experts and found to have acceptable content validity. Response format is 0 to 10 numeric rating scale. Directions ask respondents to identify their goal, or what they would like to have rather than to respond based on what they are currently experiencing. Fifteen ambulatory adult cancer patients, currently prescribed opioid analgesics, completed the instrument. Respondents were from 48 to 75 years old, had a range of common cancer diagnosis, and were 73% female. Participants reported that directions and questions were understood. Items were scored so all responses were in the same direction. SPSS was used for data entry and analysis. The reliability coefficient was .88. Inter-item correlations ranged from .4 to .8. Correlations were in the predicted direction except for one item (pain least). Although a range of responses were demonstrated for all items, responses were skewed towards desired high levels of relief. The means for selected items are: goal for pain relief 8.2, goal for pain severity 3.5, goal for importance of pain relief 7.9. A subset of four individuals identified all goals for no pain and complete relief. Results will be updated as more subjects enter the study. Factor analysis will be conducted when an adequate sample size (N>120) is reached. Based on these results, the scale was revised to 12 items with 1-item on pain severity. The goal for pain least was eliminated. The scale was deemed to have acceptable psychometric properties for use in a larger study. Additional psychometric data will be determined. The Goals for Pain Relief scale is being used to test goals as one of four predictors of the relationship between pain and opioid use. Inclusion of the goal construct may add to our understanding of variability in cancer patients' pain behavior. If goals are found to be an important construct, nursing interventions can be designed to address goal clarification and setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2001
Conference Name:
26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Diego, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGoals for Pain Relief: Scale Development and Piloten_GB
dc.contributor.authorFlannery, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsM. Flanneryen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165664-
dc.description.abstractDespite research and educational efforts, unrelieved cancer pain remains a prevalent, clinically challenging problem. Although some progress has been made, much of the variance in pain outcomes remains unexplained. Goals are identified as a critical determinant of behavior in many psychological theories of behavior. Mid-range goals provide motivation, purpose, direction, and specificity for behavior. Therefore, patients' goals for pain relief is a useful construct that may explain variance in analgesic use and pain outcomes. Cancer patients' goals for pain severity and relief have been described previously, so the purpose of this study was to develop and pilot test Goals for Pain Relief, a summary item scale. Based on a review of the cancer pain literature, a 13-item scale was developed including goals for pain severity (2 items: pain worst, pain least), pain frequency, pain distress, pain relief, and desired level of interference on activities(7 items). An additional item queried how important pain relief was compared to other goals. The items were reviewed by four cancer pain experts and found to have acceptable content validity. Response format is 0 to 10 numeric rating scale. Directions ask respondents to identify their goal, or what they would like to have rather than to respond based on what they are currently experiencing. Fifteen ambulatory adult cancer patients, currently prescribed opioid analgesics, completed the instrument. Respondents were from 48 to 75 years old, had a range of common cancer diagnosis, and were 73% female. Participants reported that directions and questions were understood. Items were scored so all responses were in the same direction. SPSS was used for data entry and analysis. The reliability coefficient was .88. Inter-item correlations ranged from .4 to .8. Correlations were in the predicted direction except for one item (pain least). Although a range of responses were demonstrated for all items, responses were skewed towards desired high levels of relief. The means for selected items are: goal for pain relief 8.2, goal for pain severity 3.5, goal for importance of pain relief 7.9. A subset of four individuals identified all goals for no pain and complete relief. Results will be updated as more subjects enter the study. Factor analysis will be conducted when an adequate sample size (N>120) is reached. Based on these results, the scale was revised to 12 items with 1-item on pain severity. The goal for pain least was eliminated. The scale was deemed to have acceptable psychometric properties for use in a larger study. Additional psychometric data will be determined. The Goals for Pain Relief scale is being used to test goals as one of four predictors of the relationship between pain and opioid use. Inclusion of the goal construct may add to our understanding of variability in cancer patients' pain behavior. If goals are found to be an important construct, nursing interventions can be designed to address goal clarification and setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:22:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:22:43Z-
dc.conference.date2001en_US
dc.conference.name26th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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